The Freudian Personality Theories

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The human personality is a fascinating conception in the medical and psychological arenas. In the realm of the psychology, the Freudian personality theory is both relevant and irrelevant; however, it outlined the driving forces behind the personality. Freud’s theory involves the interaction of the layers of the mind to result in the human behavior and the conflict between components of the conscious preconscious and the unconscious. The Freudian theory gives an interpretation to distinctive tendencies of a particular behavior. His inquiry of human brain as a mechanism not scientifically but more toward analytic assumptions and understanding of what could happen, why it happened, and the standard of the action or what should happen, is appealing. …show more content…
Is the ‘executive’ part of the personality, the palpable fragment from the individual, or what we see from the person. The role of the ego is mediating with aim to be realistic in satisfying the id’s desires. In its function, the ego struggles with the reality obstacles to satisfy the id ultimate desires (). Rewards and punishments are used in the development of the personality to balance the needs of the id and draw the limits of the ego, aiming to result in fully constructed personality free of problem issues.
Freud believed that the id, ego, and superego are in constant conflict and that adult personality and behavior are rooted in the results of these internal struggles throughout childhood. He believed that a person who has a strong ego has a healthy personality and that imbalances in this system can lead particular disorders such as anxiety and depression and unhealthy behaviors ().

The Freud theory of consciousness is critical as a foundation for understanding human thought and behavior. Freud aimed to see beyond the behavior and explored the unconscious. He significantly changed the way the world views behavior by explaining certain levels of consciousness, the components of the unconscious mind and the different developmental phases. Freud believed that many of our conscious thoughts and actions are motivated by unconscious fears and

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