Four Types Of Yoga

Good Essays
Tran, Anh - Assignment #2
Question: What is Yoga? Critically define the four yogas, intention, style, focus, and personality. Which one would you think most suited to your personality? Explain why. Simply put, yoga is a form of moksha (liberation). It is a spiritual exercise that brings peace, balance, and calmness to oneself.
There are four types of yogas. The first one is jnana or knowledge yoga. This type of yoga is intended for spiritual aspirants who have a strong reflective bent; it is the shortest and steepest path to unite with the Godhead through knowledge (Smith, 39). Jnana has nothing to do with factual information but the power to distinguish what is on the surface and what is deeper, out of sight (Smith, 39-40). This power
…show more content…
Bhakti yoga is the way to divine realization through love (Smith, 41). Its biggest goal is to identify with God and love God genuinely (Smith, 41-42). There are three features of the bhakta’s approach: japam (the practice of repeating God’s name), ringing the changes on love (different types of love based on different types of relationships), and the worship of God in the form of one’s chosen ideal (Smith, 41-45).
The third type of yoga is karma, the path to God through work or deeds (Smith, 46). It is designed for persons of active bent (Smith, 46). Like its name, karma yoga is the practice of doing for the sake of selfless acts. “Karma yogis will try to do each thing as if it were the only thing to be done and, having done it, turn to the next duty in similar spirit” (Smith, 48). They resist rushing, eagerness, and the vain attempt to multitask which would turn to laziness or selfishness (Smith,
…show more content…
This type of yoga is designed for scientific bent which focuses on connecting the body and mind to God through psychophysical experiments (Smith, 50). Raja yoga’s purpose is to activate the deepest part of human self by leading the inquirer to direct personal experience of “the beyond that is within” (Smith, 52). There are eight steps to the experiment. The first two steps begin with self-awareness, aware of oneself and the distractions lie in wait (Smith, 52). The third step is to keep the body from distracting the mind while it concentrates (Smith, 52). The fourth step is to control the breath (Smith, 53). The fifth step is to withdraw all the senses from external objects (Smith, 54). The sixth step is to concentrate upon a single object (Smith, 55). The seventh step is to deepen the concentration into the meditation state (Smith, 56). The last step is realization in which the mind is completely absorbed in God (Smith, 56). Although these yogas are separated by different names and categories, Hinduism does not exclude them from one to another because no human being possesses one emotion or one way of thinking (Smith,

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The overall idea is to, “...[identify] basic spiritual personality types and disciplines that are most likely to work for each,” (Smith 48) and according to Hinduism, there are a total of four spiritual personality types so there are Four Paths to ensure each one is taken care of. The four yogas are created to entertain people that are, “...primarily reflective...basically…

    • 1836 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Gandhi adds, “There is only one whom we have to fear, that is God. When we fear God, we shall fear no man; and if you want to follow the vow of Truth, then fearlessness is absolutely necessary.” In other words, the spiritual progression between awareness to devotion only occurs through this chronological series of revelations and events: one first accepts the ideas of ahimsa and satya. One then applies these such lessons to one’s life and devotes themselves to its tasks at hand. Finally, one is greeted with the rollercoaster of searching and exploring different events and experiences hoping to end one day proud and happy. We can often refer to the example of a school.…

    • 1115 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Analysis Of Bhagavad Gita

    • 1266 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The understanding that the body is only a vessel that we use to reach this place of enlightenment, and is about living in this world in relation to the Supreme Being. Krishna teaches that the knowledge of one’s self leads to knowledge of god, that we must strive to learn how to see god and practice detachment can be released. The three Gunas of nature are goodness, passion, and darkness, darkness is forgetfulness and the tendency to avoid positive action. Passion is trying to seek the rewards and fruits of the world and a person’s labors. Goodness is the spirit of peace.…

    • 1266 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Both religions consider the best solution to the problem of suffering and bondage is liberation not rebirth or heavenly life. A four tier cosmology of multiple worlds is ackowledged in each religion. The world of Brahman, heaven of Indra, celestial beings populate the mid-region, the earth as a subterranean world is recognized by Hinduism. Buddhism also accepts Brahma as the highest region of abstract worlds, devas inhabit the worlds of forms…

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It warns Buddhists not to undermine unwholesome states. It suggests meditating to develop wholesome states, and then to maintain ones that have arisen. Right effort focuses Buddhists attention to healing and wholeness. This step aims to teach people to live a full life without burdening others on the way. Right mindfulness practices the four applications of mindfulness.…

    • 905 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Together they make a complete system. That is why, often, Yoga is referred to as Samkhya-Yoga. Samkhya philosophy provides answers to the question ‘why?’ for yoga practices. Without understanding Samkhya, Yoga practices are impoverished. The PYS assumes basic understanding and familiarity with Samkhya philosophy.…

    • 1009 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ethics are moral principles that set standard for what is, and what isn’t acceptable within a religion. The core ethical code of Buddhism is known as the five precepts. The five precepts, are not rules nor are they commandments, but they are simply principles of training, that are undertaken freely, and with will. Buddhists acknowledge that life is complex instead, and that instead of right or wrong, the Buddha said that there is skilful and unskilful. The five precepts are: Not killing or causing harm to other beings, Not taking the not given, Avoiding sexual misconduct, Avoiding false speech, Abstaining from drink and drugs that cloud the mind.…

    • 1336 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Transcendnt Analysis

    • 1430 Words
    • 6 Pages

    When not in the transcendent state life must then be dominated by the lower self, wherein we surrender to the self-programmed habitual reaction to events and circumstances. In daily life, then, when we do not know what to do we look to others for direction. The lower self is always looking for the reassurance that all is well. When not established in the transcendent we can never come across the new for we are always clinging to the old. According to Krishnamurti, the transcendent can only be brought about by understanding that “meditation is the constant understanding of the way of life” and that this can only be secured by the process of observation (Krishnamurti 1968).…

    • 1430 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    At the same time we need to remember that spiritual transformation is a work of grace. The disciplines themselves however are not transformative. The real transformation in us is God’s work. We have to take responsibility, our willingness to change and concur to God’s grace for our life. Practicing Spiritual disciplines are God’s way of cultivating us so He can work within us and transform us.…

    • 1996 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Buddha defines wisdom as the capability of dismissing lesser happiness for a greater one. The doctrine intertwines knowledge and wisdom, wherein the former deals with scientific/natural facts while the latter deals with the application of facts. For instance, one could memorize a sutta and be knowledgeable about it, but wisdom will only be attained when he or she applies that info to grow in life or help others. It can’t be acquired by simply believing; rather it requires experimentation and comprehension of truth. The path to knowledge and wisdom calls for an objective and unbigoted mind that disregards all reality phenomena/notions as impermanent, incomplete, without fixed entities.…

    • 1540 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays