The Four Phases Of Long Distance Sprinters And Sprinting

1222 Words 5 Pages
In the paragraph above, the sprinter had four phase to go through while sprinting. Long distance runners have two major phase and the motion between long distance runners and printers are different. Sprinters have more focus on the thighs and the hip muscles. The long distance runners focus more on their feet and their legs to provide the motion while running. The first phase for the long distance runner is called the Stance Phase Matt Phillips (2016) explains that the stance phase is divided into four different stages. The first stage is called the Initial Contact. This stage begins when the left foot is in front and about to hit the ground. While the right foot is behind and off the ground. When the foot makes impact with the ground this …show more content…
The foot propels forward because of the left ankle, knee and hip all extending to push the body up and forwards using the elastic energy stored during the braking phase. The more elastic energy that is available during propulsion stage, the less the body has to use certain muscles to achieve that energy. The end of the propulsion stage ends when the toe of the left foot leaves the ground which is also known as toe off. The other major phase of long distance running is called the Swing …show more content…
However; sprinters require short burst of speed so sprinters power the legs, hips, and glutes to gain that short burst of speed. Rachael Moran (2013, October 16) explains that the quadriceps are muscles that are in front of the thigh. The quadriceps raise the leg and propel the runner forward. Quads also help the leg pull forward for a sprinter to get that burst of speed. The stronger the quads the faster the legs are able to pull the body forward allowing the sprinter the ability to sprint during a race. While the quads are in the front of the leg the hamstrings are in the back of the thigh. The hamstring pull the thigh so the sprinter has the force to push off the ground quickly. Hamstrings and quads work at the same time on alternate legs, so both the quads and hamstrings need to toned and elastic to make the sprinter quick when racing. The glutes are maybe one of the largest muscles in the body. The glutes help the sprinter assist in propulsion and helps support the work of the quads and hamstrings. When sprinting the glutes work less than the legs, however; when the glutes are engaged the muscles helps to avoid injury of the leg muscles. Hip flexor are critical in sprinting because they allow the legs to move quickly and helps the body propulsion of speed. The last important muscle for a sprinter is the calves. The calves are vital muscles for sprinter. The calves control the foot flexion while sprinting.

Related Documents