Noble Truth Buddhism Essay

Improved Essays
Buddhism

The Four Noble truths (Own Words)

The first noble truth (Dukkha) –Dukkha relates to all of the things we undergo in life that may have negative effects. A translation of Dukkha would relate to suffering in regards to illness, poverty, disease, old age and death. Despite Dukkha sounding
Like a depressing view on life, it can also be seen as a realistic view on life.

The second noble truth (Origin of Dukkha) – This truth is about the origins of Dukkha and why we have suffering, and according to Buddha it was due to our desire, and there are three forms of desire, these being the three roots of evil which are, Greed and desire, Ignorance or delusion and Hatred or destructive urges. So in simpler terms, Buddha saw Suffering as a result of having negative desires.

The third Noble truth (Cessation of suffering - Nirodha) – This truth is about ways to extinguish desire thus extinguishing suffering. According to Buddha’s teachings, to extinguish the three roots of evil and to reach enlightenment, you must attain
…show more content…
Being a Buddhist is a quest to discover and put these methods into practice and constantly strive to develop and grow within. For instance, a commonly heard benefit of the practice of Buddhism is that it leads to a strange feeling of both calm and excitement at the same time. While ultimately, it 's not these biomechanical changes, like stress reduction, that we 're striving for but rather a more spiritual state of mind. Now, with modern scientific equipment, we are able to objectively measure and record the numerous positive benefits of Buddhist meditation. It 's a state of life or a life condition. As our spiritual selves develop, our bodies respond. It is the state of being a Buddha and as our bodies change, our spiritual selves respond. In the future, we may experience greater levels of happiness than ever

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    This two philosophy shares a same profound theory and look forward to achieve real happiness in every individual. While Buddhism deeply follows and believes in the cause and effect, GNH also shares the similar view and appreciates the cause and effect to achieve GNH in the country. The most important lessons that the Buddhism and GNH preach is being content and following the middle path. If we become content with what we have, it is more likely to have a real ultimate happiness and lead to the path of enlightenment. Buddhism and GNH are just two different method of convincing the people but shares the common goal to achieve ultimate…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Buddhism is more of a philosophy of life that helps the individual reach his or her highest potential. This research has definitely taught me more about the beauties of Buddhism and humility that followers of this faith have. It has also helped me to a greater appreciation of this faith. First I learned more about the history of Buddhism. Buddhism is another religion that has its roots in India.…

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Spread Of Buddhism

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages

    By understanding these Zen ethics, realizing and understanding how one thinks, speaks, and acts can lead to complete self-realization. Buddhism can help develop ones moral strength through the control of negative actions and gathering positive actions for personal, mental, and spiritual growth. This has helped me to appreciate every life challenge and each lesson that comes from them. By using ideas of Buddhism such as the Middle Way, every challenge may impact life by expanding the mind and living with balance. To some, the idea of Buddhism is not something they are open to, but this class taught me to be open to any idea.…

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Impermanence In Buddhism

    • 1055 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The talk is usually spoken by Thich Nhat Hanh who is a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, peace activist and spiritual leader. It is to accord perfectly with the spirit of the Dharma and respond perfectly to the situation in which it is given. As the Dharma talk gathers devoted Buddhists, it gives them a “foundation on which life is built”. The Dharma talk reinforces the idea that we are not ‘lone-self’ but we are all integrally connected. This is essential to the Buddhist experience, it teaches adherents that we are all one and Vesak reminds Buddhists of this.…

    • 1055 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    It helps to develop positive states of mind, such as calmness, clarity, and emotional positivity. Central to meditation is the practice of mindfulness. When we are mindful, we are aware. We notice what is going on around us and inside us. Regular meditation practice trains the brain and the body to be in the present moment and to enter into a relaxed state, where communication between the conscious mind and the physical body is dramatically enhanced.…

    • 1078 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Before He could find a solution to the problem of suffering in life, He had first to look for the cause of suffering. Buddha discovered that the direct causes of suffering are desire or craving, which is caused by ignorance. This is the truth of the cause of suffering, which is the Second Noble Truth.When desire is a function of greed and selfishness then it becomes a source of Dukkha. Desire is ultimately a craving for a separate and permanent self through attachment to the various processes of existence. The second noble is saying that suffering is caused by craving of what one cannot have or craving to avoid the inevitable.…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Buddhism is a religion founded by Siddhartha Gautama as a reform movement within Hinduism .The teaching of Buddha is that life is filled with suffering caused by desire, that suffering vanishes when desire vanishes. That enlightenment obtained through right actions, wisdom and meditation releases one from desire and suffering and rebirth. All living beings are caught in samsara; the cycle of birth, life, death, and rebirth, characterized by suffering. Tahna is thirst or craving which causes suffering, when one reaches Nirvana he or she is free from all suffering. “Nirvana is self-knowledge, equanimity, awakening, and ultimately salvation” (Buddhism p.38).…

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Moksha In Hinduism

    • 1260 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Enlightenment is necessary for Moksha. In Hinduism, there is the way of works, way of knowledge and way of devotion as the road to salvation. The practice of Yoga (Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga and Jnana Yoga) is denying the self in work and love and absolute knowledge. Removing selfishness is the way to Moksha. Ignorance must also be removed in order to attain Moksha by the way of knowledge.…

    • 1260 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If you have a positive state of mind, you experience positivity. It focuses on how people can deal with everyday situations, and how to keep a positive mind even under stress 11. Is the notion of God necessary to Buddhism? Judaism, Christianity and Islam tend to focus on what does God want. However Buddhism makes you look closely on what you want and it shows you ways in which you can gradually transform that into a deeper wisdom.…

    • 1167 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Section 21 emphasizes suffering as Buddhist core doctrines equate it to birth, ageing, sickness, and every imaginable darkness prevalent throughout people’s lives. And Buddha himself preaches that the one and only key to end suffering was reaching nirvana. From what I remember from the Hindu chapter, Hinduism likewise acknowledges the existence of suffering in human nature. But in addition, Hindus affirm that they can overcome suffering by taking pleasure in reuniting with god (Moksha). And though both groups have nirvana as their ultimate goals in life, the paths they take upon reaching the objective tend to differ.…

    • 289 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays