The Four Ideas Of Aristotle's Views On Nature

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One of Aristotle’s essential views on Nature is his idea of the four major “causes.” These four is causes are material cause, formal cause, the moving cause, and final cause. Matter, is the physical composition of the object: the components it is created out of. Form is the way in which these parts are put together which includes the properties of the object and the functions that arise from it. The moving cause is the thing which about an event or an action, and the final cause is the reason for an event. This can be either a purpose for doing something or it can be the scientific, physical reasoning for why something occurred. For example, the final cause of someone walking may be to become more healthy. Additionally, one final cause for …show more content…
The material cause, is the components out of which the object is made out of. For example, this may be the wood in a table or the parts of a house. The matter of an object has no bearing on how the components are put together. Instead, it is the individual parts which fall under the category of the matter. Form on the other hand includes the way that the matter is put together and the properties of the object. For this reason, Aristotle considers form to be more a part of nature than matter. An example of this can be seen in a table. One of the properties which defines a table is its ability to hold something placed on top of it. The table’s property of providing a support for the object placed on top of it is both its final cause and a property, or nature, of the table. However, Aristotle does acknowledge that matter is important in the way that it can help to determine form. Because the matter an object is made out of determines the object’s properties, the matter does have an indirect impact on the nature of the …show more content…
This can be exemplified by the fact that a table does not necessarily need to be made out of wood. It can be made from other materials such as metal or plastic but as long as that matter achieves the purpose of a table, it has the form of a table and therefore the nature as well. It’s important to note that form in this context does not refer just to the physical shape of the object but more to its properties. A statue and a man may have similar physical shapes but that does not mean that they have the same form. Similarly, there are multiple ways to build a house and it is not the parts which determine something is a house but rather the way those parts are put together to provide shelter. According to Aristotle, something is not itself just because all of its parts are there, it is itself because of the fact that those parts are put together in a way that achieves its final cause.To Aristotle, the nature of an object lies less in what physical parts the object is made out of and more in how those parts are put together to bring about an effect or end

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