Feminist Disability Theory

Improved Essays
This essay will be discussing the four domains of feminist disability theory, which are; representation, body, identity and activism. This essay will discuss the feminist responses to these specific four issues with supporting quotes and evidence from the reading and an article in attempt to define concepts, to critically interrogate them and highlight hoe these issues are framed in feminist though and activism.
Representation of feminism and disability has in many cases been catagorised as one body, and in many cases seen as less. One cannot be identified as disabled and labeled as feminine without the overpowering mention of the other. Having a disability becomes one’s identity, and cannot be seen as anything outside of the disable label
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The body is seen as a physical tool that can be up for change and restructuring from the original form. There is the conversation what does it mean to critique the normalization of the femine body, and possibly using modern medicine to help improve or enhance the female physical appearance as if the female body is always appearing to look better once there is an adjustment made to their physical features. Both disability and the female body are seen as bodies that always need to be helped and fixed. The female disability theory suggests that female bodies are dependent on medical advances to try and attempt what is broken, or rather what would need adjustment, with the assumption that it will make one feel better about who they are, and can improve who they were once medical intervention has been approved. Viewing both female bodes and disabled bodies as problematic, and are structured abnormally from men and abled bodies alike in society. The article highlights that, ‘Perhaps feminist disability theory’s most incisive critique is revealing the intersections between the politics of appearance and the medicalizations of subjugated bodies.’(Garland-Thomson, 2002). For many years, the socially constructed idea that is important for a female …show more content…
Standing up to ideologies that one cannot be feminine and disabled, as if they both are defined by the same meaning with a certain concept. It is about searching and fighting for equality, and seeking to be seen as different rather than claiming as being the same entity. Disability and femine beauty is of two different ideas and concept, and should be treated as such, and not catagorised as one in the same. Doing activism in a public sphere to receive attention and in hopes to gain recognition in order to continue the battle, and receive fair treatment along the way to progress and further success. It is about, ‘commercial incentive to include ‘non-normative’ not grounded in a moral framework.’ (Garland-Thomson, 2002). It is about the normalization of feminine disabled bodies as nondisabled bodies for equality and fairness in the public’s eyes. For example, which is also mentioned in the reading, breast cancer campaigns. These marches were means to publicly advertise their bodies and show the world that the so-called enabled bodies are capable of being normalized and are not abnormal, but should be considered equally to any other body shape that is been seen in the public. Showing the importance of normalizing the “abnormal” physical attributes, and embracing a different type of people, and look beyond the disability of

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