The Five Stages Of A Healthy Grief

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Register to read the introduction… According to Kubler-Ross (2013), the grieving process is comprised of five formal stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally acceptance. The first stage, denial, actually enables the person to initially endure an incredible loss. While it may seem counterintuitive, denial is actually a critical aspect of the healthy healing process. It is comparable to entering a stage of shock. The act of denial actually is a protective mechanism that helps a person cope with the overwhelming situations. (Kubler-Ross & Kessler 2013) One could interpret Job’s statement, "Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away"(Job 1:21) as a form of denial. Others may interpret it as his unwavering faith in God's …show more content…
Some people worry that their feelings of despair will last forever. Yet this stage is part of the natural order of loss, and a critical component of the five stages. When someone is depressed they become withdrawn. They sometimes question whether or not they should go on themselves. The depression stage is part of the natural healing process and is a necessary step one must experience in order to heal. (Kubler-Ross & Kessler 2013) Job reveals his own deep depression he says, “My days are swifter than a weaver’s shuttle, and are spent without hope."(Job 7:6) “Let that day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said." (Job 3:3) and continues to question why he survived birth and should probably never have been conceived. (Job 3:3-11). Job is feeling hopeless and is becoming depressed. He also feels his problems are with no end in sight, and he is experiencing the thoughts of giving …show more content…
Those of the Bahá'í faith believe that the body, mind, and spirit grow when they are tried by suffering. Trails or tests are viewed as a gift from God. Those who have these tests and persevere will have happiness while those who don’t are cowards. They are asked to turn to God and pray when enduring these tests and be thankful. “Grief and sorrow do not come to us by chance, they are sent to us by the Divine Mercy for our own perfecting” (Bahá'í International Community 2013). Job persevered and believed there was a reason to why God was putting him through these trials. Studies have shown that those who attend church, pray, and actively practice their faith actually suffer less depression and resolve their grief sooner than those with little or no faith at all. (Quick, 2012) Clearly, there appears to be a correlation between spiritual beliefs or faith, and the ability to handle stress and accept tragedies in a more positive way. Healthcare providers, counselors, and clergy have all recognized that having a faith to cling to or a greater belief in life after death can ease the grieving

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