The First Waves Of Theominism, And The Social Feminist Movement

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The First Wave of feminism took place from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th. The struggle most often recognized when discussing First Wave feminism is that of suffrage, or the right to vote, however many more topics of equality were brought to light during this era. For example, contraception, prostitution and objectification were other topics that were focused on. As with any of the Waves of feminism, the people following these activist ideals were divided into two categories: the first of these were the “social purity feminists”, and the second were the “New Moralists”. These two categories, though both feminist, were founded on very contrasting ideas surrounding topics such as race and class. The former of the categories …show more content…
The second group, the new moralists, were significantly smaller, and took a different approach than the social purists. First and foremost, they sought to remove the notion that women are asexual, and advocated for sexual equality through the desire to separate sex and reproduction. They also believed in contraception, as it allowed women to express her sexuality without fear of unwanted pregnancy, which challenged the social purist’s method of ‘only have sex when you are married’. Arguably the most important topic covered by the group, the new moralists stood for “monogamous relations that could be freely entered and freely left” (Bland, 15). To me, the ideals put forth by the new moralists are far more compelling than that of the social purity feminists. The new moralists were radical at the time, but now fall simply to the left of the political spectrum, which is where many of my values lie. As a future social worker and intersectional feminist, I believe in the freedoms of all women and persons to do as they chose, particularly with their sexuality, without oppression or repercussions, and I believe that the new moralists express these notions far better than the social purity …show more content…
The paper states that there is no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, or any sort of orgasm, except for that of a clitoral one. Koedt explains that even if the orgasm is made through stimulation of another sort, such as vaginally, or even mentally, the actual orgasm is rooted in the clitoris. So the question that comes to mind is why do we as a society continue to focus on vaginal penetration if that is not the way to help the female partners achieve orgasm? Though she provides many other explanations that will be discussed, Koedt simply states that the answer to this question is “We are living in a male society which has not sought change in women’s role” (Koedt, 113). To expand, it is discussed how many women will not admit that they cannot orgasm through vaginal penetration alone for a plethora of reasons, including not wanting to damage their male partner’s ego, faking orgasms to end sex, as well as using their vaginal orgasm to entice men. From this description, it can be easy to assume that men are simply clueless to the need for clitoral stimulation, however this is not the case. The Myth of the Vaginal Orgasm touches on the point that men recognize the importance of clitoral stimulation to provide arousal and lubrication during foreplay, and then it is ignored during actual intercourse, “leaving [the female partner] both aroused and

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