The Feminist Movement In The 1920's

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America has had a problem with women's rights since as far back as the 1920’s. From wanting the right to vote all the way to women wanting the same pay as men and to be more accepted in the workforce. Many people say feminism comes in waves. The first major ‘wave’ was in the 1920s for women's suffrage. The second was in the 1970’s for respect towards women in the workforce. And now there is another feminism event happening, but it's not necessarily a movement this time, it’s a revolution. On January 1st, 2017 one of the biggest marches in U.S. history took place it, “included about 3,267,134 and 5,246,670 people in the United States.” (Chenoweth & Pressman 2017) This was the Women's March. The reasoning behind this huge outcome was because the day prior, Donald Trump became president of the United States for the next 4 years. Trump has mentioned groping women in the past, asked women in his office to “dress like women”, and referred to his running mate, Hillary Clinton, as a ‘nasty women’. Some people are referring to this as the second American revolution. The women's march gave the world spirit. …show more content…
Another march took place in the 1960’s that was for a very similar cause; Women's rights. Although the movement was started on wanting equality for women in the workforce, it grew into something the world had never seen. It flourished into body empowerment and the views on roles in the house and in childcare. Many women crowded the streets “On August 26, 1970, on the 50th anniversary of women’s suffrage, NOW”( History of Marches and Mass Actions). (NOW standing for national organization for women) “Activists organized a “Women’s Strike for Equality.” Approximately 50,000 women marched in New York and another 100,000 women participated in demonstrations and rallies in 90 cities, 42 states.” (History of Marches and Mass Actions). Making this another one of the biggest marches in

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