The Feeling Of Love In Desiree's Baby, By Kate Chopin

1289 Words 6 Pages
What does the feeling of love mean and how does it control one’s actions? Multiple playwrights and authors have used this as a basis for their stories or plays. Throughout American literature, the theme of love is the most important because it can be displayed in many different aspects and readers are most often able to relate. Love as a theme is used in many different ways throughout stories or plays and it is quite important. In the article, “Love in Literature,” the author explains that love can be used in a variety of ways because this theme can have unseen twists and turns throughout it, as well as many different endings. The theme of love has been used in plenty of famous stories and plays, such as Romeo and Juliet, Wuthering Heights, …show more content…
Desiree’s husband falls in love with her at first sight (Chopin). At first, they are inseparable from each other. When they have a child, Desiree loves the baby to death. Armand’s love for her fades due to the color of the child. His new lack of love for Desiree and their child pushes him to have his family leave. Desiree’s mother learns of this and sends for the baby and her to come be at home. Her mother wants them to be somewhere that they will be loved. Armand later learned the truth; that his own mother was of color and loved him so much that she kept it from him (Chopin). In an article by Michael J. Cummings (Desiree’s Baby: a Study Guide), his take on the misunderstanding is that Armand rejected Desiree because he believes that Desiree is of mixed backgrounds, which shows he never actually loved her to begin with. “Real love is colorblind,” says Cummings (J. Cummings). While the love in “Desiree’s Baby” ended due to an unfortunate misunderstanding, not all authors have their love stories come to a close for invalid reasons, such as in Miller’s “The …show more content…
American literature, but the theme of love is essentially the most versatile and important. The theme of love can be displayed in many different ways throughout stories and plays in literature. Its importance is shown in “Ain’t I a Woman?” by Sojourner Truth, “Our Town” by Thornton Wilder, “Desiree’s Baby” by Kate Chopin, “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller, and “A Streetcar Named Desire” by Tennessee Williams. There are varying types of love and actions caused by love or lack thereof in these stories and plays, although each has its own significance. Although many may argue, the theme of love is still vastly universal and tends to causes emotional response more than other

Related Documents