Analysis: The Federalist Papers

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The Federalist Papers What makes America so unique compared to other countries? For starters, America has a democratic government system, thus, separating itself from the dictatorships and parliamentary systems most governments stem from today. The founding fathers were key contributors in making America what it is today as a world power and pioneer of democracy in having a country ahead of its time, with attention to grand tolerance of people involved in its politics in comparison to other countries across the world. Had it not been for a collaboration of letters published to the American public, the United States may have not been what it is today. These letters published that led to the shaping of democracy in the United States we know …show more content…
Constitution and why this type of government with a stronger but evenly balanced federal government was the best choice for the United States of America. The Federalist Papers were written to help endear those states, unsure of the yet to be ratified U.S. Constitution. The government’s first constitution “The Articles of Confederation” was rushed and flawed in the Federalists eyes in that the Federal Government basically lacked the power to keep the country unified as opposed to the states being territories doing whatever they wanted with no …show more content…
S. Constitution which would give less power to the states in comparison to The Articles of Confederation. The big debate at the time was whether this new Constitution would emulate the type of power England expressed in its unconstitutional taxing which led to the American Revolutionary War, and eventually the United States of America. The Federalist Papers were eventually successful in persuading New York, but that doesn’t mean the authors of such were for all that came with the U.S. Constitution, e.g., The Bill of Rights. The Bills Of Rights are the first ten amendments of the U.S. Constitution, since states needed to ratify the U.S. Constitution like New York would not, in fact, ratify the U.S. Constitution if it had not included some unalienable rights and liberties. These exact enumerated unalienable rights and liberties that were ironically influenced by the English Bill of Rights 1689,among others. The Federalist Papers had a letter as done by James Madison, wholly dedicated to the opposition of this. James Madison felt as though this Bill of Rights was unnecessary due to provisions already in place in the U.S. Constitution, yet as the states Anti-Federalist resilience became clear, James Madison himself scripted these unalienable rights and liberties to mitigate, those of which have become synonymous with American

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