The Federalist And Anti-Federalists

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The Federalists and Anti-Fedarlists of the 1780s, were not the first political parties in The United States, but were political factions created to achieve a short term goal. The Federalists were primarily wealthy conservatives from cities and the East Coast. They supported ratification of the Constitution, and a strong central government. The Anti-federalists were composed of working class, poor, rural people, that opposed ratification. They were in favor of a weaker central government that allowed local government to hold more power. Following the ratification of the Constitution the two political alliances were dissolved. Document A strongly expresses support for the Federalist cause. The article starts of expressing the various benefits …show more content…
The article highlights the issues the Anti-Federalists had with the Constitution. The author expresses his belief that without a clear bill of rights the generations to come will not know their rights, and could easily be oppressed by a ruler. The author gives several examples of bill of rights, to serve as an example for the Constitution of the United States. Under the proposed constitution the author believes corruption and greed will spread eventually leading to a country ruled by an absolute monarch. Article C shows support for Federalists cause. The writer clearly express his Federalists beliefs by stating that a strong executive branch is key for a country’s success. The author continues by stating the positives of a strong government, that it protects a nation from foreign threats, keeps the peace, and provides security for everyone’s property and assets. Through a strong central government and executive branch the author believes no one can oppose the Nation, and bring chaos and …show more content…
The author states that in the case of a monarchy the king can be controlled, but with a president no one could stop him from taking charge of his army. The major focus of the article is that a president, in the eyes of the author, can set the terms in which he rules, and that power could turn a president into a dictator. The author believes that even if the president breaks the law he will still be exempt from punishment. The author fears that under the constitution and a president the will face a new form of oppression. A strong Anti-Federalist viewpoint is expressed in the Document F. The author opposed the ratification of the Constitution because he fears that the small group that wrote it has too much influence, which can led to corruption. The author believes even if a person in power acts selfless or the promises to help the people, he will always attempt to benefit himself. The writer fears that by granting power and influence to a select few individuals, they can be easily bribed. The author also believes that the American people will not be accurately represented by the few chosen to represent the

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