The Fear Of Change In The Crucible By Arthur Miller

1479 Words 6 Pages
Change, it’s a word that is feared. It’s a concept that no one likes. It’s a memory that brings back old emotions. For being something that is so called dreadful and awful, it’s something that is a vital part of Human Nature. There is such thing as necessary change, change that people have to undergo to become better people. John Proctor, one of the main characters of “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller, is one person that went through the process of allowing himself to change. “The Crucible” is a play that is based on the Salem witch trials. In the play a group of girls are caught dancing in the woods with a house servant, only, dancing is forbidden in Puritan culture. In fear of getting in trouble the girls lie and blame it on witchcraft, this …show more content…
The trials were the cause of many changes, including the way the accused were viewed. John Proctor allowed the trials to change his view of life and his view of the people in his life for the better. Proctor is Introduced in Act 1. At this point in the play he is aggressive and authoritative. “Be you foolish Mary Warren? Be you deaf? I forbid you to leave the house did I not? Why shall I pay you? I am looking for you more often than my cows” (Arthur 14). Proctor doesn’t appreciate when people go against him, and disobey him. He has a temper and he doesn’t know how to keep it under control. Proctor likes having power over people, and this is evident when he tells Mary Warren that he is capable of not paying her. He thinks very highly of himself and thinks that everything should be done his way. The aggressive side of Proctor is shown when he says “I’ll show you a great doing on your arse one of these days… Do you look for …show more content…
Act 4 shows him in his final stages of change. How he went from a self centered egotistical man to someone truly sorrowful of his actions. “I cannot mount the gibbet like a saint. It’s fraud. I am not that man. My honesty is broke. Elizabeth; I am no good man” (Arthur 59). Proctor has come to terms with the fact that he didn’t live the most fulfilling life. He is remorseful and feels guilty that he hasn’t been a good, faithful man to his wife and doesn’t want to die pretending he lead a good life. “I can. And there’s your first marvel, that I can, You have made your magic now, for now I think I can see some shred of goodness in John Proctor. Not enough to weave a banner with, but white enough to keep it from such dogs” (Arthur 62). John’s words reveal that he sees himself as a changed man. He sees the effect that the witch trials had on him and he is willing to accept that he isn’t perfect, but that he has become a better person. Act 4 shows Proctor in a new light, as a changed

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