The Role Of The Feud In Romeo And Juliet

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After reading William Shakespeare’s possibly most famous play, Romeo and Juliet, one may think to themself; “Whose is at fault for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet?” In the play, a young man named Romeo Montague and a girl named Juliet Capulet find themselves falling in love and marry shortly after they meet. However, their families are in the midst of a generation’s-old feud. The feud leads to Romeo killing Tybalt Capulet in order to avenge his best friend Mercutio’s death. In response to this, he is exiled from the city of Verona. Juliet’s parents arrange for Juliet to marry Paris, a kinsman of the Prince of Verona. Juliet, unhappy with the arrangement, looks to Friar Lawrence for help, who devises a plan for Juliet to fake her own death and …show more content…
The feud affected both Romeo and Juliet greatly and largely influenced the outcome of their relationship. The feud indirectly caused Romeo’s banishment from the city of Verona. If it weren’t for the feud, Mercutio would not have been killed by Tybalt, which led to Romeo avenging him. After Romeo avenged Mercutio, Prince Escalus punished Romeo by banishing him. Even earlier in the play, if the feud was not constantly going on and growing, Romeo and Juliet might have been able to marry with their parent’s consent, allowing them to live happily. Lastly, while they may not have realised it, the only way to end the feud was with their deaths, as seen in the prologue with the line “A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life; Whose misadventured piteous overthrows doth with their death bury their parents’ strife” (Shakespeare 7). These are all extremely pivotal points in the play, that, if they did not happen, could have seriously altered the outcome of Shakespeare’s most famous …show more content…
Everyone in the play has contributed towards the deaths of the two characters in one way or another. However their deaths were mainly influenced by the foolish Romeo, the blind Juliet, and the constantly quarreling families. Romeo’s foolishness contributed by allowing Romeo to not think things through and make poor decisions. Juliet was blinded by her own love - she did not stop to think that what they were doing wasn’t a good idea. Lastly, the families did not allow Romeo and Juliet to love each other peacefully, requiring them to marry in secret. When combined, these three things were a perfect formula for their demise, and as one can see, it worked

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