What Is The Moral Of Into The Wild Chapter 13 And 14

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After reading Into the Wild chapters 12 13 and 14, I had a lot of thoughts about the family background and why Chris would discard everything and get into the depths of the wilderness and start his own wild life without any hesitation. Chris’s inharmonious relationship with his parents, especially with his father, was one of the main causes that drove him away to the deserted, frigid Alaskan wild. Chris’s unquenchable anger towards his father was normal, however, unjustified. He would never be able to understand the unbearable pain of parents who outlive their child. The similar experience of taking adventure of Mr. Krakauer, the author, also revealed some of the impulsive thoughts of young people that Chris also had. Some people may think …show more content…
They either stopped eating or started to eat compulsively. They almost cried their eyes out, trying to understand “why Chris had to take those kind of chances” (Krakauer 132). The worst thing that could happen to parents who outlived their children might be seeing things that may remind them of their late children. A child’s death is especially traumatic because it is often unexpected. Therefore, the emotional strike can lead to a wide range of psychological and physiological problems such as depression, anxiety or even worse, long term diseases like PTSD. These symptoms have so many negative impacts on parents’ physical and mental health. The parents had already been sorrowful and suffered enough for the loss of their children, most of them would choose to pack the mementoes of their children, lock them up and forbid themselves opening them up again. But unfortunately it is so difficult for them not to think of their children again that they cannot help unwrap the mementoes, consequently, all the memories came flooding back and they may probably drown themselves again in the grief, pain and guilt and could barely get out. Time cannot be reversed, the irreversible pain that Chris caused to his family cannot be …show more content…
The author, Mr. Jon Krakauer had the similar experience which can explain some of Chris’s crazy behaviors. “As a youth, I am told, I was willful, self-absorbed, intermittently reckless, moody. I disappointed my father in the usual ways. Like McCandless, figures of male authority aroused in me a confusing medley of corked fury and hunger to please. If something captured my undisciplined imagination, I pursued it with a zeal bordering on obsession, and from the age of seventeen until my late twenties that something was mountain climbing” (Krakauer 134). Mr. Krakauer shared the enthusiasm with Chris in mountain climbing, he also had some conflicts with his father as most of the teenagers did. “I was twenty-three, a year younger than Chris McCandless when he walked into the Alaska bush. My reasoning, if one can call it that, was inflamed by the scattershot passions of youth and a literary diet overly rich in the works of Nietzsche, Kerouac, and John Menlove Edwards, the latter a deeply troubled writer and psychiatrist who, before putting an end to his life with a cyanide capsule in 1958, had been one of the preeminent British rock climbers of the day. Edwards regarded climbing as a “psycho-neurotic tendency”; he climbed not for sport but to find refuge from the inner torment that framed his existence” (Krakauer 134). Mr. Krakauer was also obsessed with the writers and easily influenced by them, urging to

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