The Falsification Of Science: Rudolf Carnap's Verification

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The field philosophy of science has been responsible for countless significant advancement in our civilization, among the circle of respected scientists, the Contemporary philosophy of science has been struggling with a question: what is science? In that comes the birth of the Demarcation Problem that attempts to distinguish science from non-science, and is fiercely argued between Rudolf Carnap and Karl Popper around mid-twentieth century. The Logical Positivism initially named the process of identification of science “verification”, which means it is only scientific when dealing with empirical results, theories or experiments that are verifiable. Rudolf Carnap has his own set of testability and meaning, for example, the verification was later reduced to confirmation, and eventually toned down to probability. In short, Logical Positivism’s criterions of demarcation thinks that it is scientific if there …show more content…
Falsification is pursuing the truth by accepting a hypothesis theory which explains the facts better than others, and the theory itself doesn’t necessarily needs to be proven true. In contrary, Verification is that a theory is a mode contains explanations of our existing universe, and that each time an experiment or observation is conducted that adds to or decreases the theory's predictions, said theory is then verified to hold true. It turns out that Popper’s work happens to be on top of Carnap’s doings in regard to the progress of science in the 20th century. Popper’s theory laid out the standard of the fact that all scientists should be critical to and of themselves, as they should perform wide ranges of experimentation and solving the problems with bold conjectures. Most importantly, a good scientist that follows the Popperian doctrine must not be precious about their theories, as they should attempt at every chance to falsify

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