The Fall Of Satan In John Milton's Paradise Lost

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This literary analysis will define the religious significance of Paradise Lost by John Milton through the context of free will and the fallen state of man in this protestant epic poem. Milton’s protestant text was historically a countermand to the Roman Catholic Church, since it defines the freedom of different Christian sects to practice their own faith through free will. The fall of Satan in Paradise Lost defines the core values of rebelliousness against the Roman Catholic authority by, ironically, making God’s most powerful angel a heroic figure. Therefore, the “fall of man” is described through the heroism of Satan to rebel against God as a metaphor for “free will” in poetic form. Milton’s poetry provides a meaningful criticism of the Roman …show more content…
Surely, this is another example of the protestant claim to choose their own version of a Christian God, which defines the revolt against the Roman Catholic Church through the Lutheran ideology. These are important aspects of the characterization of the ”fallen” angel in Satan and the fall of humanity in Adam and Eve. This aspect of “the fall” of Adam and Eve define the symbolic aspects of protestant life, which alienated many Christians from the Roman Catholic Church, Milton deliberately infuses this aspect of ‘free will” into the liberation of Adam and Eve through the “rationality” of Satan’s rebellion against God. Certainly, this is a major point in the religious significance of Paradise Lost as a poetic example of protestant frustration and anger at the corruption of the Roman Catholic Church during the mid-17th …show more content…
This view of the protestant religion is part of the struggle between an individual. Such as Satan, that is unable to find redemption in comparison to Adam and Eve that must continually seek redemption in the eye’s of God: “From granting hee, as I from begging peace:/All hope excluded thus, behold in stead/ Of us out-cast, exil 'd, his new delight,/Mankind created, and for him this World(Milton 4.104-107). In this manner, Satan has become a heroic narrator that expresses the extreme version of anti-Catholic sentiment by Milton, but he is also religiously aware of Adam and Eve’s free will that enables to them judge their own view of

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