Andy Clark The Extended Mind Analysis

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Critical Analysis of the Extended Mind The concept of extended cognition is introduced in Andy Clark and David Chalmers’ article “The Extended Mind”. In it, Clark explains that the idea of extended cognition deals with the notion that external objects and interactions play a major role in helping the cognitive process. In this essay, I will critically examine Clark’s idea of extended cognition and how it pertains to real life technologies. Introducing this concept, Clark begins by asking the question, “Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?” (7). Two ways of approaching this question is physically, where there is the boundary of skin and skull, or by way of words, essentially arguing that “this externalism about meaning carries over into an externalism about mind” (7). However, Clark takes a different approach and proposes a different type of active externalism. In active externalism, cognitive process are not held in a closed system, but rather, occurs when …show more content…
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