Tension Between Sparta And Athens

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The Greeks were very influential to the development of our modern world. The city-state or polis was the main political unit of Greece in this time period. The two major city-states in Greece were Sparta and Athens; they were sometimes united in order to defeat a common enemy. However, there was much tension between Sparta and Athens during this time period; these two cities were the main competitors in the Peloponnesian War. These two city-states were different in the way they ran their governments. Athens showed characteristics of early democracy that inspired the modern world’s form of democracy. Sparta took a more authoritarian and militarized approach to their government. The effects of the Peloponnesian war would lead to a new form of …show more content…
The Peloponnesian War was a war fought between Athens and Sparta. The city-states worked together in the Persian War to defeat the Persians, however tension began to arise between the city-states after their common enemy was defeated. According to Western Civilizations: Volume 1 by Cole and Symes, the Peloponnesian War was predicted by Thucydides to be “the greatest war in history.” Thucydides blamed the war on Athens’ growing power and the fear of surrounding city-states (like Sparta) fearing the loss of their independence. The sole purpose of the Persian War was to ensure Greek independence and Athens was beginning to display the oppressive characteristics that the city-states had fought so hard to relinquish. In the 470s, Athens began to threaten and punish city-states that were resisting Athenian rule; this led to Sparta being Athens’ only enemy by the 440s because Sparta refused to give up their independence. This increasing tension between Athens and its resistor would lead to the Peloponnesian …show more content…
She was the goddess of love and one of the twelve main gods and goddesses. According to an article by Marie Benedicte-Astier from The Louvre Museum, the Venus de Milo was discovered in 1820 on the island of Melos and was donated to the museum in 1821 by King Louis XVII. The statue is actually several pieces of marble that are put together using pegs. The original statue was also adorned with jewelry and was decorated with paint in a technique called polychromy. The original statue had arms but the arms were never found. The Venus de Milo displays a contrapposto stance which was a pose of relaxation and confidence but also a pose that portrayed a readiness for action. The famous pose of the Venus de Milo has been influential in art all throughout history. For example, it can be seen through Michelangelo’s David and Rocket Raccoon’s movie poster for Guardians of the

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