Women's Rights Movement: Lucretia Mott And Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Amazing Essays
Throughout history, group that are not in the category of heterosexual, white male have always had to fight for the basic rights. The birth of feminism is one of the most important parts of American History and has aided America to truly be “the land of the free.” This time in American history has so much value that can help modern day America realize the importance of not denying anyone their rights. Like many other unfairly treated groups, the fight for women’s suffrage was a long fight, yet nevertheless, women won and it is a critical part of American History. Through the Women’s Rights movement, many other advancements for the equality of all people occurred. Women are not the only group to have tirelessly fought for their American rights. …show more content…
This convention took place in England and when the men delegates voted to prohibit women from continuing in participating in the events, these two women became allies. These two women then suggested they should have a convention in America that discussed the rights of women. Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton then later added Jane Hunt, Mary Anne McClintock, and Mott’s sister, Martha Wright to their new idea. The New York Married Women’s Property Rights legislation had just come out when these women all met to discuss what was happening and how they felt. This gave them the courage and fire to stand up for what they believed in. Elizabeth Cady Stanton urged the rest of her group to finally take a stand and to encourage other women to join them, which the other women immediately did. Stanton then wrote the Declaration of Sentiments where she quoted the Declaration of Independence in saying that “all men and women were created equal.” In this document she demanded resolutions that would advance the equality of women in America. She then presented this in front of a crowd of about 300 people, including 40 men, at the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls at the Wesleyan Methodist church. All of the proposals were passed that were presented in this document, except for women’s …show more content…
So, in 1869 Stanton and Anthony formed the Nation Woman Suffrage Association. Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell, and Julia Ward Howe believed that women and African Americans should continue to unite in their fights for civil rights, so they crated the American Woman Suffrage Association. As time went on, however, it became very obvious that women’s suffrage was going to require the associations to unite in the fight. Thus leading to the formation of Nation American Women Suffrage Movement. During this time of the movement, women became very creative in the way the fought for their right to vote. They used any avenue they could. In 1916, on Valentine’s Day, women made “Valentine” cards for all of the congressmen. These cards actually pushed the passing of the 19th amendment. The women left these cards in the desks on the congressmen so that when they arrived to work, they received them. In 1853, the Una, the first feminist newspaper, began in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1868 Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony started the Revolution, a periodical that was noted as the most fundamental piece of publishing in the women’s rights movement. From it’s motto: “Men, their rights and nothing more; women their rights and nothing less!” to its articles, this publication helped greatly to achieve the goal of universal suffrage which got passed in 1920. Similar to other human rights movements, as the activists

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    After the first meeting on July 19th at Seneca Falls in New York, abolitionists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony planned meetings to work on getting more rights for women (“The women 's rights movement”). After a significant amount of fighting and convention after convention to try and gain rights, they came up with a solution, this solution was Amendment 19. This Amendment would give women more rights that men have and the expectations that everyone would expect of women (“Passage of the 19th Amendment”). Women 's suffrage was important and gave women the right to vote and more access to education. During the Women 's…

    • 1412 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Even though Susan B. Anthony may have passed away, her courage to stand up for women still continues to spread. She was a very influential person due to her accomplishments in the field of women’s rights. She grew up in a politically active family and was raised a Quaker. They believed everyone should have the right to be treated equally. Together they worked to end slavery and named it the abolitionist movement.…

    • 434 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Eventually, Anthony would go on to become the president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) which unified all women’s rights activists under one organization. The NAWSA would pave the way for women’s equality and open opportunities for future generations to continue Anthony’s and others suffragists’ efforts (Women’s). Moreover, Anthony’s impact on American history is displayed through her writings and propaganda regarding women’s rights. One of Anthony’s most well-known works is her women’s rights newspaper titled The Revolution, which sought to educate the public about the challenges facing American women. As Anthony herself vehemently states, The Revolution’s purpose is, “To educate all women to do precisely as I have done, rebel against your man-made, unjust, unconstitutional forms of law, that tax, fine, imprison, and hang women, while they deny them the right of representation in the government” (Anthony, An…

    • 1747 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Many history books tell about glorious battles, courageous military leaders, and larger-than-life discoveries; however, they downplay substantial social events that have had immeasurable ramifications on all aspects of America’s history, including the woman suffrage movement. The woman suffrage movement was a women’s rights crusade in the 1800s and early 1900s that gave females the right to vote as well as the right to attend college and to hold a professional job. This is one of the social movements that makes America exceptional, and as Alexis de Tocqueville says “If America ever ceases to be good, then America will cease to be great.” (6) The woman suffrage movement has extraordinary value and, although there were some road bumps along…

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Anthony faced many challenges, but she overcame many of those. One of the toughest and most important challenges of her life was fighting for woman's rights with the rest of her partners on the National Woman Suffrage Association ("Susan B. Anthony Biography," 2015). Anthony overcame this by working with the rest of the women in the National Woman Suffrage Association for a woman suffrage amendment to the Constitution. Her death date was 14 years before the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution became law, giving women the right to vote (Sochen, 2015). The two main Habits of Mind she used were Persisting and Striving for Accuracy because she followed her plans through the whole time and made sure she was reaching her goal the most effective way possible.…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Susan B. Anthony was a tireless leader who did all she could to help women gain the right to vote. As a result of her efforts, she wrote the Nineteenth Amendment, which allowed women in all states the right to vote. A pioneer is someone who starts something new. What makes Susan B. Anthony a pioneer of women’s rights in this country? She is a pioneer of women’s rights because she was the first to advocate for women’s suffrage by organizing and participating in conventions and rallies.…

    • 759 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women have fought to be considered equal for an extended period of time in history. To this day, women are still fighting for their rights. The women’s rights movement started primarily in the 1920’s in the United States. One of the goals of the movement was to let women vote: women’s suffrage. This influenced the era of the 1920’s by showing that women had a voice and could stand up for equality.…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Anna Shaw's Speech

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages

    When the movement is a case to help gain the rights of women, the process creates conflict. After the women’s suffrage movement, the U.S government concealed legal evidence that in fact all citizens that have stayed within the nation for a period of time can vote, it caused havoc amongst genders in the country. By subtly incorporating the rhetorical principles logos, anecdote, and procatalepsis in her speech, Shaw inquires support from the audience to demand the rights of women and perform their duty as an American citizen so that they can certify a more promising future for the…

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Her motto was “Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.” With this motto she influenced people while she advocated for women’s rights. Along with this, she helped to bring about the abolition of slavery. Susan Brownwell Anthony played an immense role in the history of the United States’ society all the while empowering the next generation to continue to uphold this magnificent movement. Susan B. Anthony heavily influenced and affected the Women’s Rights Movement. She could easily be considered the “Mother of Women’s Suffrage.” We need people like Anthony to continue to protest for their beliefs of equality.…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Starting in the mid-1800s a revolutionary movement began to root itself among the American population and other cultures around the world, Women’s Rights. In the push to raise awareness of the oppression of women and the inequality of sexes women traveled the country speaking to anyone that would listen. Two women stand apart in the effectiveness and remembrance of the speeches, as well as their leadership positions and impact they left on the nation in the development of equality. In the early years of this fight for women’s suffrage small conventions were held such as the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, where a leading reformer Elizabeth Cady Stanton spoke to an eager crowd of women and men following women 's rights. This movement led to a similar women and friend of Stanton, Susan B. Anthony to travel a’ nd speak as well, most famously her address on women 's Right to vote of 1873 describing her experience and beliefs.…

    • 1539 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays