Women's Rights Movement: Lucretia Mott And Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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Throughout history, group that are not in the category of heterosexual, white male have always had to fight for the basic rights. The birth of feminism is one of the most important parts of American History and has aided America to truly be “the land of the free.” This time in American history has so much value that can help modern day America realize the importance of not denying anyone their rights. Like many other unfairly treated groups, the fight for women’s suffrage was a long fight, yet nevertheless, women won and it is a critical part of American History. Through the Women’s Rights movement, many other advancements for the equality of all people occurred. Women are not the only group to have tirelessly fought for their American rights. …show more content…
This convention took place in England and when the men delegates voted to prohibit women from continuing in participating in the events, these two women became allies. These two women then suggested they should have a convention in America that discussed the rights of women. Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton then later added Jane Hunt, Mary Anne McClintock, and Mott’s sister, Martha Wright to their new idea. The New York Married Women’s Property Rights legislation had just come out when these women all met to discuss what was happening and how they felt. This gave them the courage and fire to stand up for what they believed in. Elizabeth Cady Stanton urged the rest of her group to finally take a stand and to encourage other women to join them, which the other women immediately did. Stanton then wrote the Declaration of Sentiments where she quoted the Declaration of Independence in saying that “all men and women were created equal.” In this document she demanded resolutions that would advance the equality of women in America. She then presented this in front of a crowd of about 300 people, including 40 men, at the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls at the Wesleyan Methodist church. All of the proposals were passed that were presented in this document, except for women’s …show more content…
So, in 1869 Stanton and Anthony formed the Nation Woman Suffrage Association. Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell, and Julia Ward Howe believed that women and African Americans should continue to unite in their fights for civil rights, so they crated the American Woman Suffrage Association. As time went on, however, it became very obvious that women’s suffrage was going to require the associations to unite in the fight. Thus leading to the formation of Nation American Women Suffrage Movement. During this time of the movement, women became very creative in the way the fought for their right to vote. They used any avenue they could. In 1916, on Valentine’s Day, women made “Valentine” cards for all of the congressmen. These cards actually pushed the passing of the 19th amendment. The women left these cards in the desks on the congressmen so that when they arrived to work, they received them. In 1853, the Una, the first feminist newspaper, began in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1868 Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony started the Revolution, a periodical that was noted as the most fundamental piece of publishing in the women’s rights movement. From it’s motto: “Men, their rights and nothing more; women their rights and nothing less!” to its articles, this publication helped greatly to achieve the goal of universal suffrage which got passed in 1920. Similar to other human rights movements, as the activists

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