Racism And The Post-Civil Rights Movement

2160 Words 9 Pages
There is a perception that the American racist mentality is dead. However, this is not the case, seeing how the post- civil rights movement era is subtly reminiscent of the civil rights time period. That observation leads one to believe that all members of each race possess characteristics or abilities specific to that race, especially so as to distinguish it as inferior or superior to another race. The reason that this perception that racism exist, is based on the ignorance society has toward the evolution of racism. Racism directed toward African Americans in the 20th century involved physical torment, which led to the destruction of the mind. An examination of racism against African Americans causes one to see that the evolution of racism …show more content…
In the case of African Americans, their value is low, which creates an inferiority complex. This view of black people has not changed, since they forcefully stepped foot on American soil. The Civil Rights era was an interesting time to be black in America, as the abolishment of slavery was enacted, but the public value of the African American did not change. America 's continued to see black people as what they once were: slaves. That mentality sparked the first evolution of racism in America. This evolution was the age of segregation. White- only washrooms and Black- only schools were created, which implied that the proclamation in the thirteenth amendment did not fix the problem of racism. It in fact, appeased the situation. Civil Rights leader Malcolm X noted this lack of change, saying, "I see America through the eyes of a victim. I don’t see any American dream. I see an American nightmare". This comment explains the crippling inequality the freed African Americans faced due to their value in the eyes of the American public. Systematic procedures of segregation made this advancement of racism work. This system controlled the social activity of where and how African Americans could exist. Segregation in America was facilitated in a manner to build up barriers, which prevent African Americans from gaining equality. It took a semi- peaceful movement to usher in the modern day era of …show more content…
It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his twoness, — an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being to

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