Upton Sinclair's The Jungle: The Evils Of Capitalism

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Quilt Square Theme: The Evils of Capitalism
How the Theme Applies to the Novel
Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle describes many horrors in early 20th century America. Revulsions that Sinclair thoroughly mentions include the dirtiness and filth that existed in American meatpacking industries, the political corruption and mafias that existed in major American cities, the huge homeless proletariat, and the evil misuses of capitalism. Of these horrors, the one that most surprised and appealed to me was how capitalism was abused by the American aristocracy to steal and feed off the less fortunate social affiliations such as immigrants and African Americans.
Sinclair describes the evils of capitalism in many ways. One way Sinclair demonstrates
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Upton Sinclair spends an excess amount of time describing the political corruption in Chicago. Although at first capitalism may seem to have no connection with bought elections and political exploitation, it evidently does under more detailed scrutiny. Millionaire corporation owners like Phil Connors and Mike Scully are the ones described in The Jungle to be involved in shady political business. Correspondingly, the reason why persons like Mike Scully were able to buy elections and continue the favor of political policy is devoutly because of their massive economic gains through capitalism. Additionally, Jurgis expresses, when involved in political corruption, he was tired of fighting over interests that favored the wealthy, and it was not until Jurgis discovered socialism that he felt he was properly represented by a political party. Granted, the buying of city elections and exploiting politics is not capitalism’s fault but its operators. However, it is a clear way if how capitalism can be severely abused to violate the virtues of a country which takes democracy and civil rights extremely …show more content…
Continually across the novel, Sinclair displays the existence of only two social bodies in the American hierarchy: the poor proletariat and the opulent aristocracy. Furthermore, in such a social division the elite, since there were less of them, always teamed together to obtain their interests by consuming the will of the gigantic peasantry class. While the wealthy celebrated in their lucrative mansions, the common folk was subjected to squalid, claustrophobic tenements never fully clothed, fed, or washed. A great example Upton Sinclair supplements is when Jurgis meets Freddie Jones on the streets. In this altercation both of America’s social bodies meet. Jurgis, hardly surviving in his betrayed American dream, constantly moves employers, perpetually works for minimum wage, and begs time to time to get by. On the contrary, Mr. Freddie Jones casually invites poor strangers to his palace, serves them a meal comparative to a premium Thanksgiving feast, and without hesitation hands them $100. Another example of how 20th century capitalism divided the public into two distinctive groups can be explicitly seen through the labor and residential conditions each group experienced. Millions like Jurgis worked in major industry corporations like Brown’s and Durham’s only to be greeted with foul,

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