Bloody Sunday Research Paper

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How did the events of Bloody Sunday affect Russia during World War 2 as a whole?

War is like a long row of dominoes, as soon as one falls over, it causes a chain reaction sending each one falling until the row is completely destroyed. War World War II was a six year long torture as thousands of civilians were killed everyday whether they were in concentration camps or in battle. The fear and anger that was festering inside of people led to many who had enough with the way they were being treated in their country. Russia was no different as thousands of people gathered to strike against the Czar, fighting for demands, which lead to many casualties in the process. The- supposedly- peaceful protest quickly turned into a bloody massacre as the
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Thousands of people worked eleven hours per day ,but their pay was slowly dropping. Cost of necessities were also starting to rise which made it difficult for many people to provide for their families. Gradually, workers began to form unions and rebel against their manager, but unfortunately, owners of shops could sense the anger in their workers. Therefore, the owners used the police force to their advantage. In an article written by historian, William Atkins, he explained: “Employers could treat workers as they pleased and could usually depend on the support of the authorities and the police to enforce disciplinary actions” (Atkins).The strikes were just one of the problems that Russia had to deal with. They were also in a- losing- war against Japan leading to Russia, which was starting to become more corrupt. The failures in war and corruption added up to Russia: slowly starting to fall apart. Later, propaganda started to go up around the country, as Russia was about to go into war with Japan, and they wanted to boost their morale, thus, had a meeting about it. The meetings were made up of the regional or the zemstvos led by Alexander II. People- even the ones with higher jobs- worked eleven hours a day and even on the weekends worked ten hours on Saturday. …show more content…
As stated before he was a Russian Orthodox priest and used to be a prison champlain as well. His goals were that he wanted to help workers as much as he could so he decided that he wanted to make a more personal approach in helping. According to William Atkins he, “began organizing workers' clubs, called the Assembly of Russian Factory Workers of the City of St. Petersburg”(Atkins).9 He hoped the petition he made, would help the people, he hoped it would help if it was more personal so he made a petition, getting hundreds of people to sign it with problems they faced. Atkins described in his article that Gapon started a petition, “outlining the workers' sufferings and demands, calling for an eight-hour workday; the freedom to organize trade unions; better working conditions, free medical aid, and higher wages for workers” (Atkins) as well as listing more freedom in politics and in general with the freedom of speech, press, and religion. Approximately 150,000 people signed it in hopes of the Czar listening to their

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