The Event That Disturbs Brrutus Is The Crowning Of Brutus Act 1

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1. In Act 2, Scene 1, the upcoming event that disturbs Brutus is the crowning of Caesar. Brutus fears that if Caesar becomes king, this might cause him to obtain too much power. As stated by Brutus in Scene I, Line 11-13, he said, “I know no personal cause to spurn at him, but for the general. He would be crowned. How that might change his nature, there’s the question.” Brutus cares about the Romans, and he cares more about Rome than Caesar. By giving Caesar the crown, the people of Rome are granting Caesar power. In this quote, the readers are able to understand Brutus fears Caesar will take advantage of his power and of Rome when given the crown. Brutus further claims, “Crown him that, and then I grant we put a sting in him that at his will …show more content…
The writer of the letter that Lucius finds urge Brutus to wake up and think about what is happening to Rome. Also, it urges Brutus to go against Caesar and to kill him. In the letter, Brutus reads, “sleepest; awake, and see thyself. Shall Rome, &c.” This letter is telling Brutus to wake up and look at himself. It is to make Brutus think about Rome and what he should do to fix the situation occurring. Within the letter, it states, “Speak, strike, redress.” Through this, it is telling Brutus to take action against the crowning of Caesar. When crowning Caesar, “Rome stand[s] under one man’s awe,” which the letter urges Brutus for it not occur. Also, It reiterates a past event in regards to the Tarquin drive in order to convince Brutus to kill Caesar. Thus, the letter that Brutus opens intends for him to fix Rome by removing the man who is becoming a tyrant. Additionally, I believe the writer leaves a gap so Brutus can fill in the gaps with his own thoughts and imagination. When the writer does not provide Brutus with the answers, this creates a feeling of suspense and mystery, which Brutus has to answer himself. This gap allows Brutus to understand what is really happening to Rome, thus, leading him to kill Caesar. It is also to emphasize the letter which tells Brutus to wake up “Brutus, thou sleep’st. Awake, and see thyself.” In Scene 2, Act 1, Line 51, the letter reads, ““Shall Rome, &c. Thus must I piece it out: Shall Rome stand under one man’s awe? What, Rome?” This …show more content…
Calpurnia and Decius Brutus have different interpretations of Calpurnia’s dream. Calpurnia’s perception of her dream is negative and danger was to come. Her dreams and her intuition cause Calpurnia to believe Caesar is going to die. She understands the people’s friendliness is only a façade. They do not hope for Caesar to be king. Rather, they hope for Caesar’s death. As states in Act 2, Scene 3, Calpurnia tells Caesar, “Help, ho! They murder Caesar…. In ranks and squadrons and right form of war, which drizzles blood upon the Capitol; the noise of battle hurtled in the air… O Caesar, these things are beyond all use and I do fear them” In this dream, Calpurnia foreshadows Caesar’s assassination. She dreams Caesar’s statute is sputing out blood, which the Romans are bathing their hands in. Calpurnia believes this means the people of Rome are euphoric about the fact Caesar is dead so he can no longer endanger Rome. To Calpurnia, she fears that people are trying to kill Caesar. She seeks for help and she even tells her husband, Caesar, not to attend the Senators meeting today. Due to Calpurnia’s dream, she says hints there are signs of danger. “These things are beyond all use, and I do fear them.” Calpurnia interprets her dream as a dangerous threat towards Caesar’s life. This is because “the heaven themselves blaze forth the death of princes.” In order to justify her belief, Calpurnia tells Caesar the Gods are sending warning about Caesar’s death because he has a high

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