The Enlightenment Era And The Philosophy Of The Declaration Of Independence

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How could a tree grow without the foundation of the roots embedded underneath the motherland? Which could be also said about the the document that inspired America’s founding, the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration of Independence was constructed to exemplify the American colonies independence from Great Britain with the most known statement “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” A point often overlooked, the Declaration of Independence was based on the idealism of enlightenment thinker during the Enlightenment Era, which was between the early 18th century For the fear that we are not truly valuing the Enlightenment era’s contributions, it is essential to reiterate the philosophy of the Enlightenment era and the philosophical …show more content…
Significantly known, the Declaration of Independence was constructed by Thomas Jefferson to signify the the independence from Great Britain on July 4, 1776. Nevertheless, the document was to lead the way for conceptual ideals and regulations for the future of the United States. To further incline, the Declaration of Independence also detested the immoral behaviors brought under the ruler of Great Britain at the time, so the future of the United States would not fall down the same path (“Reason for the Declaration of Independence”). For instance, the main contributor for the American colony to thrive for independence from Britain was based on the fact of taxation without representation, the injustice among colonies and the militia, and the easily abusive and corruptible power of the King, which was destined to happen according to Thomas Hobbes philosophy of society relying on solely human judgement. Examples of the tragedies and the conflicts would be Boston Tea Party, Boston Massacre, and the Quartering Act (“Reason for the Declaration of Independence”). Which emphasises the point, that the Declaration of Independence give structure to how the strong centralized government suppose to supports the citizens’ rights and liberty in return for the citizens’ regulations and loyalty to the system, which reflects on the social contract …show more content…
To further incline, Thomas Hobbes believed that society could not functionally run without the help of a higher force or regulations. Comparatively, the Declaration of Independence illustrates that the government would enforce liberty and rights that Great Britain can never extinguish by the document stating “We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States;” (1776). In this case, the government, the higher force, looks over the protections of the citizens to keep tranquility and exclude Great Britain manipulation. In short, the enlightenment thinkers promoted the philosophy in the document of protecting the rights of the people and keeping

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