The End Of The Affair Victorian Analysis

1661 Words 7 Pages
Love is a beautiful thing. Love is defined as an intense connection between two people. Love can sometimes drive people to do things they would not normally do. This is evident in the book, The End of the Affair. In the book, The End of the Affair, Sarah and her lover Bendrix display what love is. They adore one another. The problem with their relationship is the fact that Sarah is married to Henry. The love Sarah has for Henry does not compare to what she feels for her lover Bendrix. Her love for Henry is old news to her. Although, Henry still loves Sarah their relationship is shattered because of the love she now possesses for Bendrix. There, however lies a problem with adultery. The women of Sarah’s time were focused on social equality, …show more content…
The book was written during the Modern Era which makes these Victorian characteristics throughout the novel odd. The author states that the house in which Bendrix and Sarah spend time in is designed with Victorian decor, we also are informed that the man in which Bendrix is writing about is from the Victorian Era and we see Victorian characteristics in Sarah. Mainly Victorian characteristics are shown in Sarah. Sarah’s lying and cheating ultimately make her the “fallen woman” of the Victorian Era. Sarah’s Victorian characteristics do not live up to the standards of the modern …show more content…
The final two decades of the Victorian era witnessed the beginning of a shift in social attitudes regarding gender relations, which is marked by a steady move away from the pattern of patriarchal male supremacy and female dependence towards the modern pattern of gender equality (Diniejko, “The New Woman Fiction”). This shift continued to move during the Modern Era. The New Woman was a feminist ideal that emerged in the late nineteenth century and had a profound influence on feminism well into the twentieth century. The term “New Woman” was coined by the writer and public speaker Sarah Grand in 1894 (Diniejko, “The New Woman Fiction”). This “New Woman” had a huge impact on society as a whole. New Woman philosophy had a significant part in social changes that led to the redefining of gender roles, women’s rights advocacy, women’s education and overcoming male omnipotence. During this stage of history, women were trying to prove themselves to be just as qualified as men. Women started to apply for jobs that men used to occupy solely. Women before were thought to be housewives and were looked at as unqualified to do manly jobs. Women also became more prominent in literature and art. During this time period famous women novelist and artist appeared, such as: Sarah Grand, Elizabeth Bishop and Virginia Wolfe. Women were able to publish what they

Related Documents