The Emotional Speech In Invisible Man's Invisible Man

Amazing Essays
Of the four major speeches the narrator of Invisible Man gives throughout the novel, each have varying degrees of effectiveness. Their effectiveness can be gauged through the the reaction of the audience, message, and most importantly, the narrator’s discovery of his true identity.
The speech that proves to be the least effective is the graduation speech given in chapter one. His high school graduation speech quickly leads the reader into a false notion that the society is accepting of the views discussed, such as the advancement of African Americans. At this speech, the narrator praises humility as the secret of success, although he does not believe this himself. The narrator knew that “being humble” is what the whites wanted to hear. The
…show more content…
The whites even make fun of the narrator when he uses sophisticated language. Additionally, he quickly obliges to the white men that were riled up over his wording of social equality. In turn of his submission, he is rewarded with a scholarship that seems to be condescending. The scholarship is a way to trick the narrator into thinking he is making progress while he is actually bound to white interests.The narrator let the white men take away his ability to express his true emotions and opinions, thus affecting the quality and genuinity of his speech. He does not employ any rhetorical devices in his speech. It may seem as though the narrator has made his point, but his words fell upon deaf ears that only listen when they feel threatened. They have no …show more content…
Brother Clifton was once an active leader in the Brotherhood, but fell victim to a white dominated society. The narrator is told he will deliver the eulogy at the funeral and becomes angered. He does not believe, originally, that his life should be celebrated. But he later accepts and gives a passionate speech about the life and success of Brother Tod Clifton. The narrator ultimately hopes that he could incite the funeral crowd with positive political action through the eulogy, and although the invisible man feels that he failed at his intention, he feels touched and unified with the all the people. Even though the narrator is unable to make the crowd to act, a failure of his Brotherhood duties, his speech about Clifton drummed into the public’s anger-- creating the fire of

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    King’s alternate audience is the white moderates who are witnessing the protests and punishment unfold. The white moderates feel sympathy for King and his cause but question his methods. He knows that he has to win over this audience if he is to get the world wide support he desperately needs. For this reason, King uses an unostentatious tone and highlights the universality…

    • 195 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Pearl was a constant reminder to Dimmesdale of the marvelous life he could be living with his family however, she helped him overcome his discomposure of what the townspeople would have said about his sin by helping him overcome his fear of confession. Reverend Dimmesdale knew his health was declining and his time would be up promptly, so he announced to the townspeople that he was the “one sinner of the world” (Hawthorne 196). He confessed that he should have been deemed unholy seven years ago along with Hester and Pearl for “unbending Puritan social and moral structure” (Loring). Dimmesdale let his lust for Pearl drive him to strive for a better life, rather than hiding in the dark with his secret sin that was…

    • 1244 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Once he meets the Council and presents them with the lightbulb, his own discovery, they dismiss it. He harbors resentment for how they disgraced his ideas. Equality shrieks, “You fools! You thrice-damned fools!” (Anthem 75). Equality’s anger emphasizes the immense pride he has in his own intelligence, as he believed he was doing good by showing them his groundbreaking invention but once they reject it, he calls them fools rather than feeling ashamed.…

    • 1397 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The narrator witnessed the white men ignoring his speech and laughing at him, but he still thought very highly of them. After he finishes his speech, the white men hand him a briefcase that grants him a scholarship to…

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Antony is appealing to the emotion of the crowd by reading the will and talking about how Caesar loved them an this helps but his speech above the speech of Brutus because they could not connect with his speech. Another advantage of reading the will for Antony is it made the plebeians feel as if caesar loved them and it causes them to be angry at the conspirators for killing him. Mark Antony’s use of pathos and exaggeration is able to elevate his speech above that of Brutus because it gives him a powerful emotional connection with the…

    • 1113 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Maya Angelou's Graduation

    • 1478 Words
    • 6 Pages

    He comes with another man who I think is the body guard. This other man is not courteous and heads to sit on the principal’s chair but the minister offers his seat instead. This white man should have waited to be asked to take a seat at least. Donleavy takes a look at his audience just to make sure it is real then starts reading from his written speech. He says he was happy to be there and says he is seeing progress like in other schools showing that he is comparing the white and black schools yet there were no improvements that were being made in the school.…

    • 1478 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This scene shows us how an Indian child proves himself to be smart but ironically the white teacher does not want to accept it because he has already accepted the stereotype against Junior’s race. Both scenes comment upon the theme because they both reveal the “true identity” of people behind the stereotypes that people have created. For example, blacks were considered inferior to whites both emotionally and intellectually. But as evidenced in the church scene, the black people’s true identity was shown in the form of respect, as well as being very flexible even when they had to give up. This is important because it shows that people shouldn’t assume based off stereotypes, rather look into the “authentic” identity of one behind that.…

    • 1985 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Kurt gave Marlow a packet of photographs and papers, and just like in Apocalypse now he was ready to die and wanted Marlow and Willard to tell his family about the great things he 's done and the life he lived out at the Inner station. Marlow keeps his promise, he goes back to his family, yet is unable to bring himself to tell the full truth about Kurtz’s business. Whereas it is unclear if Willard goes to the family, but it is easy to assume the that Marlow did not follow through with Kurtz’s…

    • 1223 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Meursault believes that by accepting Christianity, he is trying to escape his fate of death. Meursault believes this will keep him from becoming happy and dying knowing that he lived the fullest life he could, without any nonsense or false hope clouding his mind. He is especially upset at the magistrate and chaplain who will not let him die on his own terms and continue to try and convert him to a religion he does not believe in. Society In the novel, Meursault is looked as strange in the beginning for being too indifferent and detached from human emotion about his mother’s death. When he murders the brother, however, his lack of remorse or guilt, moves him to a level of refusing to conform to society’s standards.…

    • 1389 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Huck, by now, is resolute in his mission to save Jim, faces more moral challenges on land. Huck endeared himself to the hospitality of the affluent and cultured Grangerfords and when Jim pleaded with him to escape, Huck refused. It is only when Jim was whipped and the Grangerford’s bloody feud with their neighbors and Shepherdsons boiled over, did Huck decide to leave with Jim. Huck also “cried a little when I was covering up Buck’s face, for he was mighty good to me.” (175) and apologizes for lying about his identity. By now, Huck is beginning to demonstrate that he is departing from the street moral code of instinctive, functional and situational mores.…

    • 1751 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays