Theme Of Corruption In The Scarlet Letter

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They are corrupt, they are the embodiment of sin, and this is what makes them human. This is the reality of the world and her nature. Secrets, lies, and manipulation run rampant through the hearts of humanity. They hold secrets meant to be tucked away under the darkness of an iron vault, never to be heard from again and deceit clings to every word that drips from their smiling lips. However, these private transgressions are something more than just keeping things hush-hush. This is the fear of allowing the truth to set you free. Nathaniel Hawthorne discerned this verity in his book The Scarlet Letter, noting man 's want to be seen as upright yet, holding sin within his being. In the passages of The Scarlet Letter, a woman called Hester and …show more content…
Five years have passed since she has spoken with Dimmesdale and the narrator describes what Hester has been doing with her time and how her appearance has changed. She has been helping the poor and giving them clothing to wear, which leads the townspeople to begin referring to her "our Hester" as they too noticed the growing difference. Hester is no longer beautiful and has lost her womanly passion due to her new living style and in a way has been humbled. Yet, Hester seemed less and less affected by the letter as time went by. '"The letter, '" the narrator explains, '"had not done its office," ' (Hawthorne 149). The letter was suppose to bind Hester to shame, to remind her that she was a sinner and had defiled herself and her husband 's name. Yet, Hester took control of her punishment when she first embroidered it; claiming ownership over the sin that had caused her downfall. Though it may had caused her to by lonely and alienated from the townsfolk, the letter became more noble as the townspeople started once more to tolerate her. As difficult as Hester 's existence became after her adulterous ways had been found out, she was not forced to live with the guilt Dimmesdale had nor be consumed by it. Nevertheless, Dimmesdale still had yet to reveal his sin and take freedom into his own …show more content…
It was Election Day and Dimmesdale stepped down from the pulpit after another superlative speech, but things turn after he shocks the crowd when turning to Hester and saying to help him up to the scaffold. Roger Chillingworth, as mentioned as Hester 's husband, attempts to stop him, but Dimmesdale turns to him saying, '"With God 's help, I shall escape the now!" ' (Hawthorne 230), as to telling Chillingworth, whom had been torturing Dimmesdale and draining the life out of him with his presence while living with him, that he would be free from Hester 's husband for good with this public repentance. However, this is also stating how Dimmesdale will be freed from his sin as well. When he stood upon the scaffold and told the townspeople that he was Hester 's lover, he was freed from his sin. The scaffold has been represented throughout the story as a place of punishment and embarrassment for the sinner, but it 's also the place in where being liberated from the said sin is

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