The Elements Of Moral Philosophy Summary

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In chapter 4 of James Rachels and Stuart Rachels book, The Elements of Moral Philosophy, the authors examine the philosophical question whether morality depends on religion. They noted that in popular thinking, morality and religion are inseparable and that people generally accept that morality can be understood only in the framework of religion. On the other hand, from the perspective of the atheist or non religious people, the world is full of evil and in total chaos. Furthermore, the concept behind an all loving God and the ultimate rule maker of the moral code depicts the theory of Divine Command. The Divine Command Theory postulates that the question of what is morally right is commanded by God, and morally wrong is forbidden by God and draws a conclusion that the objectivity problem in ethics seems to be solved. In addition, the Rachels examine The Theory of Natural Law, which stipulates the viewpoint that the world has a rational order, with values and purposes built into its very nature. Another main point is whether there are distinctively religious positions on major moral issues that Christians must accept. In summary, Rachels claims that Divine Command Theory is the solution to the objectivity problem of ethics because ethics isn’t solely a matter of personal feeling rather, it is God’s will. …show more content…
In my own life experience and confession, I have had difficult moral issues concerning abortion or the right of a woman to choose. The Scripture does not take a position on abortion, but God commands us not to kill. More importantly as a practicing Catholic, our teaching is against abortion as well as all forms of contraceptives. Also, moral issue of concern to me is who to believe and what to believe. The Divine Command Theory suggests that God commands what is right and wrong. In many verses in the Scriptures, God condemns being rich and in another verse, God enriches

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