The Eight Themes In Biology

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1.) Out of the eight themes in biology, the relationship between structure and function is a key component. For example, the three-dimensional structure of a protein not only defines its shape and size, but also its function. Proteins consist of a long chain of 20 amino acids folded up into complex shapes. Each nonpolar amino acid folds into the interior of the proteins during the folding stage, as they are hydrophobic. The primary and secondary structure determines the hydrophobicity of a protein. Each nonpolar amino acid folds into the interior of the proteins during the folding stage. For instance, membrane proteins contain large amounts of lipids, which are hydrophobic, as water and fats such as oil do not mix. The folding of a protein …show more content…
Out of the eight themes in biology, the relationship between structure and function is a key component. For example, the structure of the mitochondrion defines the key function that it will play out. The matrix is the cytoplasm in the mitochondrion, or the fluid contained inside the inner membrane, providing a watery substance that contains ribosomes and many enzymes. Those enzymes are also vital for the link reactions and the Krebs cycle to helps the mitochondrion’s function. The inter-membrane of the mitochondrion is the space between the inner and outer membrane and its function is to store protons, which then in turn are used to make ATP as they flow down a concentration gradient. This structure is also vital for oxidative phosphorylation. The cristae tubular projections of the mitochondrion is the inside folding of the inner membrane, which provides the location of the electron transport chain of cell respiration. This structure also increases surface area of the inner membrane and helps support its function to increase the rate of ATP formation, or oxidative phosphorylation. The structure of the mitochondria reinforces the theme in biology that structure provides a base for its …show more content…
Out of the eight themes in biology, regulation plays a key component in our everyday lives. For example, temperature regulation helps maintain homeostasis and also regulates oxygen levels. External heat transfers through mechanisms such as radiation, conduction, evaporation of perspiration, and convection. Under these mechanisms, your body begins to sweat to cool you off. The hypothalamus, a part of the brain, tells our bodies to emit sweat in order to cool us down. When the hypothalamus senses that your body is too hot, it then proceeds to send various signals to your sweat glands in order to make you sweat and then proceed to cool you down. On the opposite side, when you are cold, the hypothalamus will send signals to your muscles to crease goosebumps and shivers and create warmth. This is an example of maintaining homeostasis. The hypothalamus is able to maintain homeostasis through other forms such as controlling your blood pressure as well. It also controls your hormones by sending signals to the correct glands when it senses a change to help cope with the new change. In the end, sweat is the water on your skin that helps cool you down as it evaporated by changing from a liquid to a gas, by using energy (heat) to complete that change. So, as the sweat evaporates, it will begin to cool you down, as it is being released and transferred to another system, which is also known as evaporative cooling. It will take the energy from the surface of your skin and begin the

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