Japanese Internment Essay

1641 Words 7 Pages
On December 7th, 1971, Japanese government launched a sneak attack on United States at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. As a result of this attack, President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared war on Japan the very next day which caused the life of over 100,000 Japanese to alter in the United States. FDR’s Executive Order of 9066 led to the immediate evacuation of all people of Japanese descents into internment camps and forced them to live in the most isolated parts of United States. The aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor increased nativism of many Americans towards the Japanese Americans which caused the violation of their civil rights. However, despite the negatives, Japanese American’s presence in America slowly restored with the help of organizations …show more content…
The hatred that built up during the war did not go away that easily as “hostility against Japanese Americans remained high across the West Coast.” As years go by, the Japanese Americans served as a constant reminder of the war and mainly, the attack on Pearl Harbor. As a compensation for the detainment of Japanese Americans during the war, “Congress attempted to apologize for the action by awarding each surviving intern $20,000” (Source J, #15). The uncivil actions of United States against Japanese Americans forever leaves a deep scar on the country’s …show more content…
According to US History: Japanese-American Internment, during war time, many Americans feared that Japanese Americans will remain loyal to their homeland, Japan. As a result, anti-Japanese paranoia increase in the west coast of United states. (Source J, 22) Effects of the anti-Japanese paranoia ranged from the creation of anti-Japanese posters to forming anti-Japanese organizations. In a propaganda poster named Jap Trap, it shows that the Japanese population was discriminated before the incident because of the increase of immigration and now they’re being discriminated more. Now they were seen as a threat to white society. (Source L, 26) As these posters start gaining popularity all around the country, many organizations started to form to enact what the propaganda posters are saying. According to Jennifer Speidels from University of Washington, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, one of the many anti-Japanese groups that formed was the Japanese Exclusion League. The Japanese Exclusion League was a nativist group that was founded after WWI. Because of the incident, they wanted to add “an amendment to the Constitution to prevent Japanese immigrants from becoming citizens.” (Source O, 33 and 35) The downfall of a Japanese American’s life didn’t just end here as they also faced hardships with the

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