The Effects Of The Emancipation Proclamation

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“That the President will free all the little slave children,” was the words written on a petition given to Abraham Lincoln in 1864 (Swanson 1). These few words and the 195 signatures that accompanied it were enough to touch the president’s heart (Emancipation Proclamation Little People 2). Although the Emancipation Proclamation, a document freeing about 3.1 million slaves in the United States, was issued a year earlier, there were still some people unhappy about it’s effects (Emancipation Proclamation 3). Many abolitionists complained that the Emancipation had not gone far enough (Stowell 9). Other people from the Confederacy hated the Proclamation causing their rebellion to be greater and the war to be worse (Stowell 9). Another group …show more content…
Mr. Lincoln wrote a response to Mary Mann, the “endorser” of this petition (Emancipation Proclamation Little People 6). In this letter, Lincoln asked Mrs. Mann to tell the children that had signed the Petition that he appreciated their worry and care for the slaves of the United States. After completing the letter, Mr. Lincoln gave the letter to Charles Sumner to deliver it to Mary. During this time, Mary Mann was widely known for her influence on education and being the wife of an important abolitionist Horace Mann (Marshall 5, 7). Mary Mann later wrote back to Lincoln and confessed that she had nothing to do with the Petition. In her letter back to Lincoln, she did express that she was looking forward “with more hope than ever for the day when perfect justice shall be decreed” (Emancipation Proclamation Little People 10). Even though the wife of Horace Mann had nothing to do with it, Lincoln was still affected and impressed at the care that students from Massachusetts had. Although the Little People’s Petition didn’t seem to change Abraham Lincoln’s view about slavery, it and other letters helps us understand how the President of the United States and other people in his country felt about slavery …show more content…
The Confederacy in the south and the Union in the north had split the country into two parts (Stowell 11). In the Union there were even more divisions between people. Two of the main groups during this time were the abolitionists and the anti-slavery believing people (Stowell 6). An abolitionist was a person who desired that slavery be dealt with completely and quickly (Stowell 6). Anti-slavery people also desired to see slavery abolished, but they were content to let time do its work (Stowell 6). Although these two groups were the majority of the Union, they both had very different ideas (Stowell 6). One way to understand their different beliefs is to compare the way that reacted to the Emancipation Proclamation. Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation on January 1, 1963 (Emancipation Proclamation Little People 8) because he believed that it was a “fit and necessary measure” (Klingaman 228) to end the Civil War and to destroy “the institution that was tearing the Union apart” (Klingaman 233). Although Lincoln stated that the Proclamation was “necessary”, he had not always believed that it was in his power to create and enforce this document (Stowell 6). He believed that it would be unconstitutional of him to use his power to overrule the Constitution that stated that he could not “seize property” which included slaves (Stowell 6). Lincoln also believed and expressed

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