The Effects Of Social Media On Psychological Wellbeing

1499 Words 6 Pages
Social media is a perpetual aspect of twenty first century life by influencing and affecting every part of it. 82% of adults in Britain use social media daily/almost daily (Statistics, 2016), highlighting the mass usage that has been increasing. These networking platforms which encourage social interactions and the ability of its numerous users to create and share content (Kleitmann, 2011) could potentially be damaging people in ways that were not previously anticipated. Arguably, the relentless nature of social media could be a cause of multiple negative impacts on psychological wellbeing and functioning. Psychological wellbeing is an intangible construct which is hard to measure objectively and often relates to people’s self-esteem and …show more content…
Cummings, Butler and Kraut (2002) supports the idea that low quality relationships could negatively affect wellbeing when they found that it was rare that online sites cultivate quality relationships and that online communication was not as beneficial as face-to-face communication. This shows that the substitution of real-life contact that could occur with social media usage may have a detrimental impact as relationships formed online are not of the quality that would be expected from real-life interactions. However, this study relates to older styles of communication therefore it is unclear how far these results could be generalised to newer social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Crucially though, it identifies that the impact on psychological wellbeing has been apparent since the start of mass social media usage, potentially suggesting that a cause an effect relationship could be …show more content…
The presence of depression indicates damaged psychological wellbeing. Since regression analyses were performed with factors measured, it is possible to infer that it was the use of the Internet that lead to a decline in psychological wellbeing rather than the reverse, therefore increasing support for negative effects on psychological

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