The Effects Of Sin In Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter

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Sin came into existence soon after the creation of the world. The first humans, Adam and Eve, fell into sin almost immediately. With their tumbling, they were forced to deal with the consequences of their behaviors for their entire lives. The idea that the effects of sin last a lifetime has been an ageless belief carried through many different faiths, including Puritanism. However, the philosophies of the Puritans often failed to match their actions. The hypocrisy of the Puritans allows them to be effective characters for displaying sin. Nathaniel Hawthorne employs a strict seventeenth century Puritan society and the consequences of sin to provoke sickening irony in The Scarlet Letter. The Puritan structure supplies Hawthorne with …show more content…
Women in the seventeenth century were aware that they would never outgrow the problems of gender roles in their community (Hawthorne 150). They were seen as subordinate to men, and the latter did not like to see any variation from this accepted code (Baym Web). Hawthorne, similar to Hester, works against the traditional values and codes of his society. He gives Hester, a woman, a major and uncommon role in his story (Weinauer Web). Hester refuses to speak of her fellow sinner, Dimmesdale, for the sake of the entire community (Hawthorne 61). Hester’s refusal to name her partner in adultery allows Hawthorne to present irony, as women were typically told to keep silent, but her silence rejects the authorities (Pennell Web). In the end, Hester’s rebellion is primarily cut off and each gender settles back into its original role (Weinauer Web). Though Hester tries her best, women in the story end up back where they …show more content…
The Puritans followed strict codes, some of which have been carried into the modern world. Similarly, the presence of sin has yet to be demolished, even centuries later. Furthermore, Hawthorne investigates the dramatic difference between expectation and reality. Sin is inevitable for people of all ages, genders, and religions. Everyone makes mistakes, but doing so allows people to grow and live in ways they never could before. With sin comes consequences, but with consequences comes a newly formed

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