The Effects Of Protesting For The Vietnam War

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The draft system ruined the lives of many young men from being able to pursue their school, careers, and many of which had friends, and or family that were attending school. This caused much of the student body in colleges to begin protesting. Protesting for the Vietnam war started on college campuses Students of a Democratic Society (SDS) because of the number of young adults that wanted to attend school but never got the chance to because of the draft system, which would ruin the chances of the young men with scholarships for school. The student activism group at the University of Washington (UW) was from 1948-1970. Throughout the 1950’s, students from a smaller college community began to protest the use of nuclear weapons. But the protesting …show more content…
Music also broke up into two major groups at that time. Pro-war, which consisted of country and easy listening, and anti-war, which consisted of rock and folk music. Both types of music sent out political messages in their music. At first the pro-war songs made some of the older generation people in America feel patriotic after 1966 those pro-war songs became non-existent as the number of people who protested the war got bigger. Folk singers started the anti-war music than rock came in, it was a way of bring protesters together mostly played in college campuses and by the younger generation of American’s. Anti-war music was a big factor during this time because it united protesters throughout America and what their opinions were in lyrics, it also showed how confused Americans really were about the …show more content…
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