The Effects Of Police Brutality Towards Black People

1436 Words 6 Pages
Black people have long been the victims of police brutality and racial profiling in the United States criminal justice system. On the streets, a majority of people, especially white people, still do not feel at ease when they see tall black men at night. In our society, these black men are more likely to get killed by a police officer than other Americans. A single bullet fired can not only end a life, but also trigger riots and racial tensions in the country. For instance, Trayvon Martin was murdered for looking “suspicious” after purchasing candy and soda from a grocery store back in 2012. A policeman and Trayvon Martin’s killer, George Zimmer, was not held accountable for the crime he committed, which led to the creations of national political …show more content…
Second, many black people who are persecuted are left helpless because they are not given well-resources to support their causes. Third, the police repression of blacks established that racism is still a current issue and the prejudice system in our society. Principally, police brutality towards black people led to the many protests and riots occurring to this day because of its internal racism and injustices. In our current society, people often distinguish black people in a stereotypical aspect that could often lead to consequences. Many have perceived black people as these ghettos and dangerous people that others should not mess around with. However, this impression should not apply to the entire race because how is every black person automatically a bad and dangerous person? “The review found 85% of drivers stopped by police were black, and that African American drivers were twice as likely as white drivers to be searched. Yet black drivers were more than 25% less likely to be found in possession of illegal substances or …show more content…
For instance, the Central Park Jogger Case was one of the cases that exemplified the police brutality on the innocent black teens who were jailed despite unlinking evidence. In 1989, Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, Korey Wise, Raymond Santana, and Yusef Salaam confessed to Trisha Meili’s rape and beating after hours of forceful interrogation by homicide detectives. The five served between 6 and 13 years for their complete sentences, before serial rapist Matias Reyes, admitted his crime, and DNA testing supported his confession. "To the extent that the evidence suggests that these five young men were wrongfully convicted and sentenced to substantial prison terms for a crime they did not commit, that in and of itself constitutes an injustice in need of redress" (Sanchez, 2014) – these innocent men lost their youth with their family and friends for a crime they did not commit. Instead, they have been through years of pain behind the bars because the police could not handle their evidence accurately. They were trying to find a way to link the evidence to the innocent citizens despite the unmatched semen DNA. For the most part, the case resulted in five African American teens locked away because of the police did not try to protect them from being acquitted. However, if it were to be a white person, he or she would

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