The Effects Of Mental Disorder In The Fall Of The House Of Usher

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It is often said that people are shaped by the obstacles they face through life and the way they choose to approach them. Many people believe that Edgar Allan Poe used his own knowledge about mental disorders at the time and his own experiences dealing with his mental condition to create a codependent relationship between sick character of Roderick Usher and his sister Madeline Usher in “The Fall of the House of Usher.” As a result of today 's advancement in science and psychology we are all well informed about mental illnesses and their symptoms to be able to easily recognize them. Having been raised by a mother with bipolar disorder I find myself in a position where I can sympathize with the narrator of the story in a very interesting way. …show more content…
He captures everything Roderick and Madeline go through during his staying. Likewise I sometimes felt like an outsider in my own family and the times I felt part of it I wished I was not part of the dysfunctional family anymore. The night the narrator helps Roderick with the burial he finds himself not being able to sleep. According to the narrator "[He] struggled to reason off the nervousness which had dominion over [him]" (663). By making this comment he urges us to believe that he could feel Madeline’s spirit haunting him. From this point he went from being an outsider to be affected by the Usher 's illness. He tried to do everything he could to help Roderick ease his panic attacks. Similarly when I was a child I would try to calm my mother down and explain to her she was acting delusional and everything was going to be okay, but all efforts were all in vain. Clearly at this point of a mental illness it is impossible to help the patient especially when they are not being treated. Trying to be helpful only makes one have a predisposition to have mental illnesses of our own since one goes through so many traumatic experiences. When I was a child, I used to think that my mom was crazy and she hated me since I ruined her teenage years. As I suggested earlier being the outsider on these kinds of situations puts one in a higher risk of developing a mental illness as a result of such …show more content…
In making this comment, he urges us to believe that childhood abuse might cause anxiety disorders on the kids as adults. As an adult dealing with anxiety disorder I must believe in this hypothesis since I suffered childhood abused by my sick mother and stepfather and it marked who I’ve become today. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, “all the symptoms cluster around excessive, irrational fear and dread.” My own experience dealing with this disorder makes me believe that the way I was treated as a child made me fear a lot of simple things in life since I was convinced I was not good enough or even wanted or important. Through his stury Stein suggests that early physical and sexual abuse results in the predisposition to anxiety-related disorders. Being so victimized from early ages affects the children self-esteem, making themselves concerned about their integrity and feeling as if they could be in danger at any given time. These lonesome feelings are very common in anxiety patients and I can fully relate to them as I still question my integrity in every decision I take. In fact I still have anxiety attacks triggered by memories of my childhood even thought they seem to have no rational explanation sometimes. I am now able to deal with my disorder after years of therapy and the right

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