Language In Toni Morrison's Beloved

Good Essays
As humans, we often we look into mirrors - both literal and figurative - to find a reflection of ourselves. That reflection, however, is typically vastly different from how we are perceived by others: our friends; our families; our enemies. In the same way, we read literary fiction and find a reflection glaring back at us, a reflection that imprints in our psyches the fantasies we long to find as truths in our lives. Yet collectively, our readings of literature produce in each of us vastly different reflections, representative of the vastly different fantasies that are derived from our individual perceptions and interpretations of the world. It is this variance in reflections of the world drawn from reading and writing literature that Varga …show more content…
Often times, the human experience cannot be accurately described with the tools provided by language. This is the case particularly in attempting to capture such abstract emotions as trauma and love among others. Toni Morrison’s Beloved is an example where conventional language seems to fail in achieving a certain emotional impact on the reader. Where there are some scenes that are eloquently described, other scenes are almost incoherent. These sections of the novel tend to handle the more difficult and nuanced emotions felt by Denver, Sethe and Beloved. In an attempt to come to terms with the harsh realities of slavery and its impacts on their lives, the narrative loses clarity and at times even coherence in trying to grasp those emotions. Varga Llosa advances this as one of the unique characteristics of literary fiction, arguing that “Events translated into words undergo a profound modification.” Our lives are not constituted by words, but events. In adding words to the events that are experienced, “the novelist therefore changes nature.” This is evident in Beloved with the incorporation of the magical realism of the baby-ghost. Although the novel is mimetic in its nature, the addition of the supernatural presence of the baby-ghost is one element of the changed nature of reality in the novel - one that attempts to make sense of the tragedy of

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Although irony is used throughout “The Crucible”, it is often mistaken or confused for other literary devices. Irony is words that are usually the opposite of their usual meaning. Authors use irony in their novels to catch reader’s attention and cause suspense. Irony is used so that you cannot always predict the end of the book. Irony is used many ways In “The Crucible” along with literature.…

    • 986 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Unreliable narrators can leave the whole account feeling untrustworthy and misleading and also forces the reader to think about the story from another perspective. This is a tool many authors use to encourage a deeper level of thinking and create more layers within the narrative (Crossen, 2011). This unreliability of the narrator can also make them a more relatable, human figure and this can help the reader connect. Herman Melville’s lawyer in ‘Bartleby, the Scrivener’ has often been called an unreliable narrator (McCall, 1989, p.99) and this greatly affects the story and the message that is conveyed. The lawyer spends a large amount of time focussing on redeeming himself rather than actually helping Bartleby, even stating “here I can cheaply purchase delicious self-approval.…

    • 1640 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Nevertheless, this novel is difficult to comprehend and analyze Lawrence’s art thoroughly in novel writing. Another aspect is that different readers interpret it in different perspectives. Many readers try to understand it from a modern point of view and attach much importance to the writing styles and through which to reflect the characters and to exhibit one of the themes of the novel - the reinvention of love of the characters. In Women in Love, Lawrence uses a different technique which is contrary to the traditional to arrange the structure of the novel so as to achieve his goal. It is true that the narrative structure of Women in Love is complicated.…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find” has many strange characteristics that set it apart from most stories. The blatant and somewhat abrasive manner O’Conner goes about writing this story hints that she is attempting to portray an unsettling message. However, after closely examining the literary clues O’Connor leaves behind the readers can conclude that the piece offers a disturbing image of human tendencies and natural desires that goes unspoken in society. By closely examining the grandmother’s characterization, family animosity, and Misfit’s metaphorical purpose through a psychological lens, the reader can attain O’Connor’s commentary on the human self. What is that commentary?…

    • 1076 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A Good Man is Hard to Find in a Cathedral In works of literature, authors who use various forms of literary tools such as characterization, dialogue, and symbolism to help the readers understand the complexities within the stories. From the authors’ perspective, stories that have every detail and plot laid out for the reader will exemplify a poorly written piece of work. In the story “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver and “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Conner, the main characters had to cope with difficult situations that were presented to them. These situations made the characters change their beliefs about themselves and about the others around them. Through the use of the literacy elements of characterization and symbolism, O’Conner…

    • 1065 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As it is a well-known fact that many authors loosely base their stories on things that they actually know. We can see in many of the stories written there is an influence of the writer’s life in the stories they write. I see this in the stories that Edgar Allen Poe writes. I believe that the bricking- in of Fortunato represents the psychological repression of Montresor’s evil desires or even the bricking up of Poe’s own feelings in his life. By sealing in Fortunato Montresor can bring his life to a normal state of…

    • 812 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Many authors have in several occasions based their work on the politics and extreme love that capture the emotions of readers. Edgar Allan Poe on the other hand has a different perspective of what to offer readers as he utilizes the emotions of fear and uncertainty to articulate his message and more so entertain his readers. This skill is the reason why most of his works are celebrated in the United States of America. In order to understand the meaning behind Poe’s short story we need to analyze how the author has utilized these elements of fear and more so uncertainty as he uses insane and emotionally disturbed characters to make his message reach home to his readers. That may be complicated because the literally style that has been used in this short story is different than what the American society was used to reading but Poe wrote so that it is interpretable.…

    • 1069 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Responsibility Essay The question, “Should we be focused on Personal or Social Responsibilities?”, recurs time and time again and is sometimes used as themes in novels, though there is no right answer because people’s opinions differ from each other. In the novel, “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck, the topic of responsibility is common throughout the book. The recurrence of the responsibility in the book begs the question, “should we humans focus on personal responsibility or social responsibility?” According to Johnson C Montgomery, author of “The Island of Plenty,” he stated “As compassionate human beings, we grieve for the condition of mankind, but our grief must not interfere with our perception of reality and our planning for a better future for those who will come after us……but the truth is often very simple and reality is inhumane.” Some may agree or disagree with Montgomery, but I personally feel that some of his statements were correct although to an extent. One of his statements which was, “As compassionate human beings, we grieve for the condition of mankind”, I personally agree with this statement because people throughout history fought for balance and equality for…

    • 485 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Virtue Rewarded

    • 1856 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded, is a novel that provokes substantial ambiguity, uncertainty, and criticism regarding the narratives controversy when attempting to categorize the genuine intentions, and authenticity of virtue of the novel’s protagonist; Pamela. Importantly, the readers doubt stems from a variety of stylistic techniques that Richardson applies throughout the novel, consistently forcing his audience to shift their approach in drawing conclusions regarding the hidden character behind Pamela’s words, and actions. Much like Pamela, who finds herself in an atmosphere of secrecy which forces her to interpret the motives of others to preserve her purity, the reader must also interpret the paradoxical information they are given through;…

    • 1856 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Strength of Deception: How Appearance Can Mask Reality The true nature of an individual can be concealed by their appearances, as looks often serve to obscure a darker truth. Within Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, the stark contrast between appearance and reality is constantly reiterated through multiple characters, and the power of looks to seemingly alter the real world is a prevalent theme. Fitzgerald produces a work of literature that truly challenges the reader to differentiate between fiction and truth, illustrating how the two can so easily become intertwined. The Great Gatsby underscores the importance of appearance on reality, and emphasizes the need to notice how greatly reality can deviate from one’s fabricated life by revealing the power of appearance, the strength of deception, and the dire consequences that stem from attempting to disguise the true nature of life. The difference between appearance and reality is primarily illustrated by showing how false appearances can alter reality itself.…

    • 1056 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics