African American Discrimination

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Discrimination Toward African Americans
African Americans have always been subjected to inequality and discrimination since the seventeenth century. Between the early seventeenth century and eighteenth century, slavery had been fairly common. As a result, many people never treated African Americans fairly because people often identified African Americans as slaves, regardless if they were free or not. By the end of the eighteenth century, slavery was beginning to be abolished, but only in the northern part of the United States. From the years 1789 to 1831, as free African Americans started to increase in amount, they sought and struggled for economic and political rights and also tried to defend them, while African American slaves showed resistance
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Slaves often tried to resist the harsh conditions that they had to face when they work. The Abolition Act of 1808 banned the importation of slaves from foreign countries causing slave owners to rely on the reproduction of slaves or slaves that were traded domestically (Jones, et al. 255-256). Because slaves could no longer be imported, many landowners encouraged enslaved African American women to give birth to as many babies as they can; some landowners even illegally bought slaves that were smuggled overseas (Jones, et al. 257). African American resistance to slavery came in multiple forms. One form was cultural expression. In 1817, the New Orleans City Council allowed enslaved men and women to sing and dance at Congo Square every Sunday afternoon (Jones, et al. 258). African Americans created music with West African traditions, created their own language called Gullah, and even mixed African beliefs with Christianity (Jones, et al. 258). Other forms of resistance included breaking farming equipment, stealing goods from their masters, and revolting. For example, in 1811, a revolt of four hundred slaves killed two white men and also burned their plantations (Jones, et al. 259). Through the 1830s, many black leaders rose. Some even gave fear to the …show more content…
Whites from the south often compared free African Americans to indigenous people, saying that they are unwelcomed and dangerous (Jones, et al. 274). Whites were usually afraid that they would plan a rebellion with the enslaved people. Some states even forced them out and outlawed private manumissions (Jones, et al. 275). Denmark Vesey was one of the free blacks who created such a scare toward the whites. In the summer of 1822, a Charleston court claimed that Vesey was creating a plot with the slaves from the surrounding areas; no evidence of this was found, but the inconsistent testimony from the whites caused thirty-five to be hanged and eighteen to be exiled outside the United States (Jones, et al. 275). Since free African Americans were not considered citizens, they felt just as distressed as slaves, being greatly restricted through a number of legislations in multiple states. Due to their lack of rights, many black leaders started to rise in the north, but they were conflicted in how they wanted to integrate into society; some leaders wanted to leave the country and settle in Liberia, while some insisted that they should stay in the United States as they were born there (Jones, et al. 275). On the other hand, in 1831, people in the south reinforced slavery in any way possible. At that exact year, Nat Turner led a slave rebellion in Virginia, freeing slaves and killing any whites that they

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