Music And Performance Analysis

865 Words 4 Pages
The effects of music on brain activity has been studied numerous times. Music has been shown to influence performance on various cognitive and motor tasks. Depending on the task, music can help or hinder a persons performance. In addition to influencing task performance, it has been suggested that listening to music activates the motor regions of the brain (Chen, Penhune, & Zatorre, 2008; Zatorre, Chen, & Penhune, 2007). Simply having music training has lead to different effects on brain activity and task performance when compared to those without music training. Therefore, this study aims to examine the effects of in-game music on performance outcomes while completing a tapping task. It has long been established that listening to music …show more content…
Researchers found that completing various tasks while listening to music can either be detrimental to performance or that performance can be facilitated (Dalton & Behm, 2007). It was found that the type of task being performed determines the effect that music has on the outcome. Specifically, music is found to facilitate performance on tasks that require attention and concentration, while music during comprehension and recall tasks hinder performance (Cassidy & MacDonald, 2007; Dalton & Behm, 2007). This is thought to be because stimulating music causes an increase in motivation, arousal and perception of energy (Dalton & Behm, 2007). Therefore, the type of task being performed is found to strongly influence if music will help or hinder the performance. Lastly, the tempo of music also has an effect on task performance. A faster tempo causes an increase in the speed at which the task is completed but also increases the number of mistakes made during the task (Dalton & Behm, 2007). It has been suggested that an optimal tempo for task performance is one that is comfortable or moderate (Cassidy & MacDonald, 2007; Dalton & Behm, …show more content…
Musicians have been found to have better timing on repetitive tapping tasks when compared to non-musicians (Franěk, Mates, Radil, Beck, & Pöppel, 1991). Another study found that the amount of music training influenced performance outcomes on synchronization tasks (Repp, 2010) Professional musicians outperformed both novice musicians and non-musicians, while novice musicians performed better than non-musicians on various synchronization tasks (Repp, 2010). Overall, musicians were found to have smaller negative asynchronies, tapped with lower variability and showed greater sensitivity to timing changes than non-musicians (Repp, 2010). This could be due to the fact that perceptual and motor accuracy is generally superior in musically trained individuals than in non-musicians (Franěk et al.,

Related Documents