Essay about The Effects of Hip Hop Music

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The Effects of Hip Hop Music on Today's Youth

If a person was born anywhere between the 1980's to the 1990's, he or she is considered a part of the "Hip Hop Generation". Music is a gift that has been given to us, but the question is, "where is hip hop music going?" Hip-hop is now one of the biggest and fastest growing businesses in the world. It's creativity in sound, and its lyrics have impressed and empowered many of today's youth. But is hip-hop music taking today's youths where they need to be? Lyrically, some of hip-hop's most popular songs and musicians have negatively influenced violence, drugs, alcohol, sex, disrespect for authority, and disrespect for woman. For many young children and teenagers, this type of music can create
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Rap music was formed in the mid-1970 among the youth in South Bronx and rap artists like, "Afrika Bambata, Kool Herc, and Grandmaster Flash. Do to the enormous popularity of Run DMC; rap had crossed over on the music charts and radio stations all over the world" (Toms, 2006, p1). Rap music was about having fun, being able to express what youth were feeling and a way to keep youth out of trouble. There are many youth that find rap music an exceptional source of entertainment. According to McGarrell, "the lyrics in rap music can leave one relaxed or with vibrant beats." However, rap music has changed dramatically in the past 30 years. Some would say that rap music is the common entertainment to blame for violence in today's youth, because of the contents in its lyrics; degrading videos to women; and the over exposed feuding between rap artists.
"The glorification of living a thug life, and all it is encompassed, became the means by which all rap artists were judged. By the 1990's rap artists like, DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince, Curtis Blow and Biz Markie were no longer accepted in the rap music" (Toms, 2006, p1). Those rap artists were considered as roll models, because those rap artists relayed positive messages to their listeners (Toms, 2006, p1). "The majority of today's rap culture involves a lot of explicit material and negativities" (McGarrell). According

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