The Effects Of Extreme Poverty And Hunger

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Extreme Poverty and Hunger Certainly, there is relative poverty in the United States, and in some areas, it is quite severe. Despite the government’s call in the 1960s to end poverty, persistent poverty continues for women, children, single-parent households, the elderly, and people of color. As bleak an existence many people endure, progress has been made to assist those affected with a minimum standard of living. This is not the case in many parts of the world, where more than a billion people live in extreme poverty. By definition, poverty does not mean simply lacking sufficient income, but “…is a cruel mix of human deprivation in knowledge, health, dignity and rights, obstacles to participation and lack of voice” (United Nations Development …show more content…
The United Nations Food and Agriculture organization (2014) estimates 239 million people in sub-Saharan Africa were hungry and malnourished in 2010. For comparison, 925 million people were hungry worldwide, which translates to 1 in 3 people living in sub-Saharan Africa sustaining daily hunger. One of the most obvious reasons for the widespread hunger in South Africa is the fact 47% of the population lives on $1.25 or less per day (World Hunger, 2014). However, the hunger and poverty issue in South Africa is multi-faceted. As with any region in the world, there is often a connection with widespread hunger and poverty to the failure of economic and political systems. World Hunger (2014) states the resources of the military, political, and economic power in sub-Saharan Africa land in the pockets of a minority who live well, while their people die of starvation, illness, and from lack of safe drinking water. In addition, the people have suffered on an epic scale from political turmoil and conflict, resulting in masses of refugees fleeing from danger. Making progress in reducing extreme hunger and poverty continues to be extremely difficult as the weak government makes little effort to end human rights abuses and the other factors that contribute to the human …show more content…
This paper focused on the problems of extreme poverty and hunger, as well as combating HIV and other diseases. Although the problems in the fragile region of sub-Saharan Africa are well documented, studying the issues and its people brings their desperate need for aid into sharp focus. More than 30 years into the history of the global AIDS crisis, the African people continue to suffer far more than anywhere in the world. The sheer numbers of infected people is overwhelming and unacceptable. Moreover, 70% of those suffering with AIDS are co-infected with tuberculosis. If this were not bad enough, sub-Saharan Africa carries the largest burden of infections and deaths related to malaria and hunger. It is impossible to ignore that many, if not all, the problems in the region stem from extreme poverty. The MDGs have made progress in this area in many parts of the world; however, there continues to be extreme poverty and hunger in sub-Saharan Africa. Clearly, more time, energy, and money beyond the target year of 2015, is needed to assist those in the region. In hindsight, comparing the health and poverty issues in the United States to the human misery and calamitous conditions of sub-Saharan Africa seem superficial. However, the government in the United States must make the health and welfare of its people a

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