The Effects Of Cultural Relativism On Culture

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After reading both Kelley and Kelly’s arguments about the origin of war and the effects on the civilization, I believe that Cultural Relativism is the best approach to the issues surrounding violence and war, namely the lack of Cultural Relativism. Cultural Relativism is “the concept that the importance of a particular cultural idea varies from one society or societal subgroup to another, the view that ethical and moral standards are relative to what a particular society or culture believes to be good/bad, right/wrong” (Dictionary.com). In theory, Cultural Relativism is accepting the ideas and traditions of other cultures, and not condemning them just because they conflict with our culture.
Some of the main claims of Cultural Relativism as highlighted in James Rachel’s The Elements of Moral Philosophy are that different cultures have different morals and the moral norms define what is right in that culture. There are no objective norms so nothing can be universally right or wrong. Our society’s norms and cultures are not special considering that our society is one of many. Lastly, Cultural Relativism tells us that we need to be tolerant of other cultures as it
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They fought simply because they didn’t understand and agree with the other cultures and didn’t perceive them as equals in society, and because of that it, was acceptable to kill them to release built up tension or for revenge. Before inter-societal communication, all information about an opposing society was based solely on the stories of those who returned, which were believed to be exaggerated and untrue. Therefore, the revenge these cultures sought after could simply be the warrior’s bias of the truth, stimulating unprovoked anger and

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