Narrative For Post-Colonialism In Achebe's Things Fall Apart?

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Some authors use re-storying as a technique to offer a balanced perspective of a certain event or time period. In Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe, a third person point-of-view narrator tells the story of an African society named Umuofia in which Okonkwo commits controversial actions. Missionaries from Europe tear apart Umuofia. Joseph Conrad composes his novel using a first person narrator who is a European imperialist named Marlow. Similarly to Achebe’s novel, Conrad’s book contains controversial actions--racism--while discussing the effects of imperialism. Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart provides an alternative narrative for post-colonialism in opposition to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. By writing Things Fall Apart through a different …show more content…
In contrast to portraying potential savagery, Achebe displays the natives taking part in civilized affairs. The Umuofians in Things Fall Apart have a set of rules and customs, and take part in sophisticated activities and assemblies. Achebe displays the sophistication of the natives when he writes, “‘We cannot bury him. Only strangers can’” (208) and “In the morning the market place was full” (11). By explaining these affairs, Achebe shows the presence of customs, rules, and civilization. However, Conrad’s view differs from Achebe’s as Conrad explicates their wild and unsophisticated demeanor, “‘A lot of people, mostly black and naked, moved about like ants’” (24). Information from Achebe’s book debunks the claim of Conrad’s novel. With Achebe’s depiction coming after Conrad’s; Achebe re-stories Conrad’s claim by giving credit to the native Africans, and also offers a balance due to his different perspective and …show more content…
The major sought-after prize by the imperialists In Heart of Darkness is ivory. The strong motivation to obtain ivory has dreadful repercussions. Conrad explains the pedestal that ivory sits on when he says, “‘The only real feeling was a desire to get appointed to a trading-post where ivory was to be had, so that they could earn percentages. They intrigued and slandered and hated each other only on that account…’” (42). Yams act in a similar way in Things Fall Apart. The passion for yams has disastrous results and furthermore exploits the faults in Umuofian society. The coveting of yams is explicated when Achebe explains, “Yams, the king of crops, was a very exacting king...it demanded hard work and constant attention…” (33). However, Achebe explains that the native people are not the only ones who have mercenary intentions when he writes, “The white man...had also built a trading store and for the first time palm-oil and kernel became things of great price…” (178). Since the missionaries had infiltrated the village with their material endeavors directly before the turmoil of Umuofia, the missionaries in Umuofia were the precursors to Umuofia’s disaster. Achebe implicitly states that the welfare of a community is directly correlated with the acquisitive nature of the people. Achebe gives sympathy to the Africans. Contrarily, Conrad does not consider the

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