Anxiety In Adolescents

1171 Words 5 Pages
Anxiety is defined as a feeling of worry or uneasiness that you get when you don’t know the outcome of what is about to happen or about a current situation. Depression is defined as a feeling of constant sadness, sorrow, and hopelessness. In today’s world, these two feelings not only correspond with one another, but they are also used to describe the feelings of many adolescents. Adolescents face many changes, as they get further into life. Many can cope just fine with the simple feeling of anxiety and sadness. However, some teens are facing severe anxiety and extreme saddens or hopelessness. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), nearly 80% of adolescents who suffer from anxiety disorder aren’t seeking the help …show more content…
To many kids, family is a term that means protection, acceptance, and support. For some, it can be the key of the depression or anxiety. Those who have a strong family unit tend to adapt in different ways than those who don’t. A parent will blame himself or herself, because they don’t understand why their child isn’t happy or shy’s away from activities they used to love. Parents begin to feel as if they have let the child down or that it is their fault their child is dealing with the illness. Then, there are parents who believe it is just a phase. That everyone will get theses feelings and you just have to learn to cope with them. Even with proper diagnosis, some parents still believe it is a “state of mind” issue. Other parents have difficulty with the idea of their child taking medications or going to therapy at such an age. Without the right information, both sides can suffer. Without understanding, the connectivity between child and parent is nonexistent. It is a connection that takes work from more …show more content…
Studies look into the stigma of mental health and other options to combat these disorders over the past decade. The negativity associated with the mental health stigma has kept many at bay due to uncertainty of medications and therapies. In chapter 3, of Joyce A. Arditti’s “Family Problems: Stress, Risk, and Resilience”, self-stigma is a suggestion of why mental illness has such a strong grasp on a persons mind. One starts to internalize the negative stigma and think that they are unworthy or stupid (Gela & Corrigan, 2015). When the mind started turning inwards, you lose motivation, strength, and clarity. However, there is other research on the mind can block out the disorder and focus. Research shows that exercise and a healthy diet can help aid the fight in maintaining one’s disorder (“Managing Anxiety”, 2016). The idea of an adolescent taking bills that alter their child’s brain chemistry is off-putting. Since research about anxiety and exercise has proven to help, most tend to take the natural path first. However, a support group or therapist is suggested to aid positive self-stigma and tools to help manage the attacks or depression (“Managing Anxiety”,

Related Documents