The Effectiveness Of Prohibition In The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

1657 Words 7 Pages
“Though the Jazz Age continued it became less and less an affair of youth. The sequel was like a children 's party taken over by the elders” F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Roaring Twenties consisted of dancing, parties, and illegal alcohol. The passage of the Prohibition acts made liquor more appealing to the American public. People lost moral thoughts and values in attempts to get alcohol. They would work with people they once thought were criminals and therefore became criminals themselves. Though many books depict this new life style, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s book truly shows the extent to which people would go to get alcohol. In The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, demonstrates the ineffectiveness of prohibition through the multiple scenes of …show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald saw prohibition as ineffective. He described the twenties as “the greatest and gaudiest spree in history” later in his life (Avey par.1). He also uses the characters and events to help display his point. Jay Gatsby, a millionaire, shows the extravagance of West Egg and the Buchanans who exhibit the wealth and pride of East Egg (Avey par.6) . At the end of the book, Jay Gatsby is shot and some of the theories are that Gatsby caused his own death by going after a married women, but the truly sad part is that no one shows up to Gatsby’s funeral which could symbolize the emptiness of that lifestyle. The people who use Gatsby for his money and attend his parties did not see a reason to come to his funeral or even pay their respects. Fitzgerald uses Meyer Wolfsheim to prove this when he says, “Let us learn to show our friendship for a man when he is alive and not after he is dead” (Fitzgerald 172). He was no further use to them, so he was disposable. Even Tom and Daisy do not go to the funeral. Nick describes them saying, “I couldn’t forgive him or like him, but I saw that what he had done was, to him, entirely justified. It was all very careless and confused. They were careless people, Tom and Daisy- they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made”(Fitzgerald …show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald 's voice in saying that prohibition was ineffective. He uses several different events and references to alcohol and bootlegging to demonstrate this. The characters, occupations, drunken narration and more really show the author 's true opinion of the carefree lifestyle and large alcohol consumption. All of these combined are important when reading the book and understanding Fitzgerald 's thoughts on important topics at that time in history. As Fitzgerald said, "you don 't write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say." Which is exactly what he did in The Great Gatsby, when he proved the ineffectiveness of prohibition, its effects on the era, and people lack of restraint during their everyday

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