The Effect On The Proportion Of Women In Politics

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The Effect on Women’s Representation Since it is established that the culture of a state has an affect on the overall attitude towards women in politics, the next question remains: what effect does this have on the proportion of women getting elected? As seen in Figure 1-Attitudes and Representation, “egalitarian attitudes toward women leaders are strongly related to the proportion of women elected to the lower houses of national parliaments (r = .57; sig. = .01)” (134). The diagram essentially shows that an egalitarian culture generally leads to better representation of women in politics. Table 2-The Impact of Social, Institutional, and Cultural Factors on the Proportion of Women in Parliament further emphasizes this theory as it shows …show more content…
In post-industrial societies, different social movements created a huge divide in the attitudes of the younger generations when compared to the old (135). For example, in the twentieth century, major changes in the family, marriage, and domestic roles occurred, as a result of social reform, which led to a different view on women. This is supported by evidence, as “the traditional belief that men make better leaders than women shows a substantial generational decline in post-industrial societies” (136). With post-communist societies, the divide between the generations is not as evident. There is a more “modest” shift in views, in which the traditional attitudes of the younger generations are nearly identical to that of the older generations (136). This implies that as time elapses and modernization progresses, attitudes towards women in politics will naturally become more egalitarian in post-industrial societies; however, this does not apply to post-communist societies. In addition, as each generation progresses, women’s attitudes have become more egalitarian and men’s have remained traditional (136). Thus, demographics influence different attitudes of a …show more content…
Although the authors provided some evidence, the idea of attitude was still left very vague. How is attitude measured? Does attitude vary depending on ethnicity or income status? There could have been more detail provided in that section. In addition, the “Inglehart–Welzel Cultural Map of the World” was limited in that only certain countries were listed. Finland was able to be analyzed based off of this graphic, but Greece was not featured at all. Although I could have assumed where Greece fell on the image based off of prior research, more countries should have been listed. Finally, the independent and dependent variables can easily get mixed up at times due to the complexity of the theory, so it would be helpful if Norris & Inglehart had that information clearly written in certain subparts of the

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