The Effect of E-Money Distribution on Mobile Money Adoption in Africa

1469 Words Sep 24th, 2015 6 Pages
UNIVERSITY OF CAPECOAST
COLLEGE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION (CoDE)
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
GROUP ASSIGNMENT

GROUP MEMBERS:

1. CLEMENT NGISSAH SB/DMK/14/0008 2. JOSHUA ACKAH SB/DMK/14/0007 3. ELIZABETH BAAPA BUAH SB/DMK/14/0012 4. EZEKIEL ARTHUR MENDS SB/DMK/14/0002 5. NATHANIEL DUAH ADJEI SB/DMK/14/0003 6. FREDRICK A. ASIEDU SB/DMK/14/0010

CASE STUDY MONITORING EMPLOYEES ON NETWORKS: UNETHICAL OR GOOD BUSINESS?. LAUDEN & LAUDEN (2014), PAGE 296-7

Question 1.
Should managers monitor employee e-mail and internet usage? Why or Why not?
Employee email and Internet usage monitoring in the workplace may put
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These according to Basex, a New York City Business research company result in $650 billion in lost productivity each year.
The ethical challenge that companies face involves protecting their interests through monitoring while ensuring they do not go so far that employees lose all sense of privacy in the workplace.
From the interactive session, US companies have legal rights to monitor employee internet and email activity while they are at work. For example, according to Bradley, some employees have tried to fight against Internet monitoring at the workplace in court by suing, using the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to support their case. They have claimed Internet monitoring violates the Fourth Amendment because it is equivalent to an illegal search and seizure of property. However, Bradley indicates that courts typically side with employers, determining that employers own their company computers and related resources. Therefore, employers have the right to monitor the use of their property to gauge productivity and guard against illegal activities.
However, managers can keep themselves on sound ethical and legal grounds by monitoring only Internet use for business-related reasons. "We’ve all done it. We start reading a website during lunch and before we know it, it is 2 p.m.—a good part of the workday has been spent on the Internet. Even the boss gets carried away from time to time, says Lewis Maltby, president of the National Work

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