The Economy Of Colonial America Summary

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A Review of The Economy of Colonial America The Economy of Colonial America by Edwin J. Perkins is a detailed look into the economic and everyday situations experienced by Americans of the colonial era. Perkins uses many modern comparisons, along with comparisons to other parts of the world, in an attempt to describe the economic lifestyle of colonist. He ends every chapter with a bibliographical essay in part to show where his research comes from, but mostly in a way that encourages the reader to look further into the topics he brings up. This book is divided into two distinct sections,Occupational groups and money and taxes, and in this review I will look at each of these sections separately and then provide a small evaluation portion …show more content…
The chapter starts with a breakdown of the limits the Parliament put on the colonist via the Navigation Acts. Perkins seemingly sides with the analysis that the overall effects of the Acts did not cause any significant damage to the colonies, even going as far to say that the act benefitted northern shipping interests. The book explains how both Britain and the colonies grew at faster rates than most parts of the world in part due to this act. They reinforced each other’s progress throughout the time America was a colony of Britain. The book suggests that despite the colonies rebellion and the acts Britain imposed on them, colonist generally thrived under British …show more content…
His research brought him to the conclusion that since the colonist had such low taxes for such a long period time upon the colonies creation, that they became accustomed to rates far better than average. The book covers that by the time Britain wanted to establish more normal for the time tax rates, the colonist thought their current rates were what they deserved. Of all the things stated in the book to have caused tension between Britain and the colonies, this is the subject that Perkins goes through the most effort in disproving. Relating back to his section earlier in the book where he talks about the Navigation and other similar acts he shows that the actual economic burden that these taxes put on the colonist is negligible. This chapter makes the reader believe that Perkins follows closer to the mindset that the revolt of the colonies was caused much more in part by political separation issues and much less by economic burdens imposed on the colonies by

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