Industrial Revolution In England

The Industrial Revolution, which began in the eighteenth century in England, was the transition to new manufacturing processes. It occurred after a period of commercial expansion caused by the growing population. The innovations of this period came as a result of the increased demand for products. England’s advantages allowed the Industrial Revolution to begin within its textile industry and spread to continental Europe and North America. Although the initial changes were local, it eventually led to profound changes in politics, interaction, and the economy which impacted nearly the entire world. The Industrial Revolution began specifically in England in the 1700s due to England’s political freedom, geography, and the increased efficiency of …show more content…
An excerpt from Landmarks in English Industrial History by George Warner describes that England had many harbors and rivers, and every part of the country was close to the sea. Warner’s piece, which indicates admiration towards England’s natural conditions, notes that the the geography was an important factor that led to the Industrial Revolution. England’s natural geography allowed for easy transportation of resources, mainly including wool, coal, and iron, as shown by the map England Resources and Canals Circa 1700. These resources, which significantly accelerated industrialization, were located in close proximity to rivers and canals. This allowed for the resources to be transported to factories, where new inventions could make …show more content…
The Industrial and Commercial Revolutions in Great Britain During the Nineteenth Century by L.C.A. Knowles reports that which Germany had internal tariffs and France had numerous tolls and charges preventing trade, England had political freedom to a much greater extent. The author’s respect towards England’s political freedom demonstrates the impact it had on the Industrial Revolution. This political freedom allowed England to trade manufactured goods with other countries and colonies, helping the economy. Since England was allowed to trade manufactured goods with other countries, British goods were in high demand, creating the need for industrialization. Spain, an important continental power, was not able to industrialize as quickly as England. Spain’s political power was more centralized and intrusive. They had more bureaucrats and officials, which prevented the stream of scientific thought. England’s political freedom not only allowed for more trade, but it also established the development of

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